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Teflon Spray Lube on Lathe bed..

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Anybody have any experiences with using a Teflon spray like Blaster Teflon on their bed-ways?


They claim it doesn’t collect dust and it will not impact my Oneway tool rest and tailstock hold. Is this possible?
 
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Piqued my interest, placed an order. I had used Boeshield for 15 years or better and I ran out but cannot find the same stuff (same name on the can, it was a dry lube) so have been trying different things so I'll give this a try.
 
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Piqued my interest, placed an order. I had used Boeshield for 15 years or better and I ran out but cannot find the same stuff (same name on the can, it was a dry lube) so have been trying different things so I'll give this a try.
You should be able to find Boeshield at any good bike shop. It’s used as chain lube.
 
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If you are turning green wood, nothing stops the rust from forming; You can just help it be slick,or constantly blow the wet chips off.
 
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I tried the Boeshield and found it to be kind of sticky/gummy. Makes sense that it would be used as chain lube. I like GlideCote and/or BladeCote, made by Bostic. Almost no residue. You can also use Kiwi neutral shoe polish, which is carnuba wax. I am trying some of the Slick Stick from Ken Rizza as well, but mostly on blades and on my CBN wheels, applied to tool bevel, not the wheel.

robo hippy
 

odie

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Graphite powder works for me.

I have a little vial of the graphite powder that I keep close to the lathe. Along with a modified brush with a cloth tip, it's easy and quick to apply. I find that, even though I am using my lathe daily, I only need to apply the graphite about every other week.

When I rough out excessively wet woods, the bedways need to be cleaned and the graphite re-applied.

-----odie-----
 
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I just spent an hour the other day carefully scraping the gunk off of my bandsaw blade, it was so thick the blade stopped cutting. Put it back on and cuts great again, think I'm going to pull it back off and coat it with this PB Blaster dry lube to see if I can at least slow the buildup...maybe dry it won't build up on the wheels.
 
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I tried the Boeshield and found it to be kind of sticky/gummy. Makes sense that it would be used as chain lube. I like GlideCote and/or BladeCote, made by Bostic. Almost no residue. You can also use Kiwi neutral shoe polish, which is carnuba wax. I am trying some of the Slick Stick from Ken Rizza as well, but mostly on blades and on my CBN wheels, applied to tool bevel, not the wheel.

robo hippy
Help me understand--- you put a lubricant on the tool bevel before you take it to the CBN wheel?
 
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I've used Boeshield on my cast iron in the past and it's done a fine job of protecting it. But, for ease of use and not having to wait for it to dry, lately I've been using Renaissance Wax. It seems to work well. I've started putting a coat of it in the flute and on the bevel of my bowl gouge to help with the buildup when turning green wood. It helps on the gouge, but not as much as I'd like.
 
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Boeshield for me too, spray on and wipe off with paper towel. When I turn green I also scrub the ways at the end of the day with steel wool and PB Blaster.
 
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The Blaster was used yesterday on all my lathes and it works well. It does not dry into a haze like Boeshield but after wiping with a paper towel the paper towel looks the same as when Boeshield was used. Will see if it lasts as long but the price is nice.
 
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Teflon lube won’t help protect against rust. Boeshield was formulated to protect against corrosion for aircraft in long term outdoor storage, but it’s not a great lubricant. Powermatic recommends wiping down surfaces with 30wt machine oil, which is a good lubricant, a good corrosion protectant, and dirt cheap.
 
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Teflon lube won’t help protect against rust. Boeshield was formulated to protect against corrosion for aircraft in long term outdoor storage, but it’s not a great lubricant. Powermatic recommends wiping down surfaces with 30wt machine oil, which is a good lubricant, a good corrosion protectant, and dirt cheap.
Michael, I went through the oil stage, fighting the dust, grit accumulation that goes with it. Not for me.

I next tried Dry Graphite Spray.
PROS 1. Goes on like spray paint, no rust under it ever. 2. Dry, no dust, grit accumulation. 3. Does not go away with time, must be worn off. 4. Makes everything slide really nice. 5. Have had no issues with headstock, tailstock or banjo failing to lock down.
CONS 1. Goes on like spray paint, turns everything black, must use a few tricks to keep yellow things yellow (in my case) but not really that hard to clean off. 2. The most expensive product I have used for this.

I've only used this Blaster product about two weeks. No rust issues in my damp old shop plus all the graphite spray pluses. Cheaper than graphite spray and yellow stays yellow...time will tell though
 
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Tom, I think I talked about it in one of my sharpening videos, but can't remember..... Gunk can build up on CBN wheels, especially when turning green wood, and some woods are more gunky than others. I tried putting the Trend lapping fluid directly on the wheel, but I would end up with a racing stripe on me and my glasses. I just put a drop or two on the bevel which helps keep the wheel and me clean. I have been experimenting with the Slick Stick from Ken Rizza and I think they recommend applying it to the bevel rather than to the wheel, but it allows for more even coating on the wheel. I have been using it on my bandsaw blades too. I am waiting for some madrone logs to arrive. That stuff really gunks up the blades, Kind of like what Marvin said, once things gunked up so bad the wheel wouldn't turn and I had to scrape it off by hand.

robo hippy
 
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I'm quite sure it was my maintenance procedures with my lathe, at times I would walk into the shop and there would be spots of surface rust where I would miss wiping some of the droplets from green wood turning or maybe set a wet blank on the bed to attach the faceplate and displace the oil film enough to allow rust to form.

Maybe using the spray has helped me to be more consistent with my maintenance, not sure why, but I am not seeing the rust spots like I did and the ways are much easier to clean after a green wood turning session. One more improvement I'm seeing or not seeing is the surface rust forming under the ways as I keep that area sprayed. Actually it is still covered in the Dry Graphite spray as there is only green wood fluids dribbling between the ways touching that area.

I'm an old guy and sometimes my knees will let me get down and clean up under the bed and sometimes they won't so that part of maintenance is hit or miss...
 
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I tried the teflon spray. It does work as far as lubricating the ways. However I will go back to the old standard Johnson’s Paste Wax. It appears that there is some buildup with the teflon. Johnson’s Paste wax is more work to apply, but has always worked well for me. And it is by far the cheapest solution as I have been using the same can for years.
 
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Minwax finishing wax works great. Dries fast, very hard and slick. It also helps with the green turning, at least slowing the water, and especially, Oak caused rusting.
 
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I was at Home Depot yesterday and decided to buy some Blaster Dry Lube spray. Can't go wrong for about $5.50. I've been using Boeshield for years and also Renaissance Wax on my cast iron. Boeshield dries fairly slow, but the Blaster dries fast! It dries in a minute or two, not the hour or so that Boeshield takes. Thats nice. It dries to a whitish film that is pretty easy to wipe off and seems to leave a very slick film behind. I had to take the 3/4" blade off my resaw because of residue build up after cutting green wood. I soaked it a couple of hours in Simple Green, rinsed it off with hot water and dried it. I took it outside and coated it with Blaster, let it dry a few minutes and wiped it lightly. The Blaster left a powdery white film that cleaned off easily, but that blade sure is slick now! I need to cut some more of the green hickory that gunked it up and see if it's any cleaner than previous use.
 

Bill Boehme

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I've used Johnson's Paste Wax on everything that slides for the past 30 years or so and I prefer it over everything else that I have tried. I used to use Boeshield on hinges and pulleys for my airplanes. I tried it on cast iron surfaces on my woodworking machines and didn't like it. For various reasons I also didn't like WD-40 or any of the other products.
 
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The Boeshield that I used in the past was not T-9, it was not a rust preventative. It sprayed on and dried in seconds tuned a whitish gray and wiped off and was good for a couple months. A number of years back when the can was getting light I tried to find more but was not able to find the same can (name) and I don't have the can anymore. Blaster seems to work the same way spray it on and it dries (not as quickly as the Boeshield did) and turns a little grayish and I wipe it off. Its seems to be the closest thing to the Boeshield that I used to use, we'll see how long it holds up before reusing.
 
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Make sure that any product you apply does not contain silicone as that can ruin a finish. I use have used Boeshield, WD-40, and wax on my lathe bed, I know those are all ok.
 
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My mistake after some research what I had was Bostik Top Coat now called Bostik Glide Coat. Don't remember paying anything near what it now costs.
 
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Make sure that any product you apply does not contain silicone as that can ruin a finish. I use have used Boeshield, WD-40, and wax on my lathe bed, I know those are all ok.
I have understood that WD-40 does contain silicone, and also have read numerous agreements that silicone not only ruins finishes, but it lingers, spreads around the piece when removing said ruined finish, and leaves an ugly, orange-peely, brand-new ruined re-finish. Given this, if I ever use it, I always wipe it on if possible, or otherwise shield the difficult-to-control aerosol discharge with a paper towel around the work. It has its uses, but I generally just avoid the stuff because it is so "dangerous".

I've been happy using bowling alley paste wax on sliding surfaces, but it doesn't last a terribly long time after application. But, machines need massages too, and I like the smell of the paste wax (car wax too). It also does provide a thin barrier against oxidation, if only briefly in the high-wear areas -- eh, ya need ta put more on at that point anyway. But if time is money in your situation, there are longer-lasting, possibly more cost effective / efficient materials than wax.
 

Bill Boehme

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I have understood that WD-40 does contain silicone, and also have read numerous agreements that silicone not only ruins finishes, but it lingers, spreads around the piece when removing said ruined finish, and leaves an ugly, orange-peely, brand-new ruined re-finish. Given this, if I ever use it, I always wipe it on if possible, or otherwise shield the difficult-to-control aerosol discharge with a paper towel around the work. It has its uses, but I generally just avoid the stuff because it is so "dangerous".

I've been happy using bowling alley paste wax on sliding surfaces, but it doesn't last a terribly long time after application. But, machines need massages too, and I like the smell of the paste wax (car wax too). It also does provide a thin barrier against oxidation, if only briefly in the high-wear areas -- eh, ya need ta put more on at that point anyway. But if time is money in your situation, there are longer-lasting, possibly more cost effective / efficient materials than wax.

Don't believe half (or more) of what you read on internet forums. WD-40 makes a wide range of products, one of which is a silicone aerosol lubricant. The original WD-40 doesn't contain any silicone.

The horror stories that abound about silicone are just that. Just as there is a wide range of hydrocarbon lubricants the same is true about silicone lubricants. Don't apply silicone lubricant directly to bare wood. Don't use the greasy type of silicone lubricants on your lathe where it is liable to get on your fingers. I use a "dry" type of silicone lubricant (CRC Heavy Duty Silicone is the only one that I like) on the scroll plate and ring gear, as well as the base jaws of my Oneway, chucks. It dries without leaving an oily residue and my fingers don't come in contact with those areas anyway. Contrary to Internet myth, it doesn't migrate on its own. I've been using it for at least fifteen years without any ill effects on the finishes that I use. Orange peel is the result of operator error on sprayed finishes.

To change the subject slightly, I mainly use Johnson's paste wax on sliding surfaces of woodworking machines. I don't use anything on my lathe bed (it is stainless steel so rust is not an issue).
 
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Hijacking thread warning!!! Speaking of lubricants; anyone have thoughts on something one could spray/ apply to a drum sander paper to help avoid build up from oily hardwoods??
 
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Silicone is considered a contaminant when it comes to applying nitrocellulose lacquer. It causes "fisheyes" in the finish, and about the only way to overcome that is to add more silicone to your lacquer than is on the item you are spraying. Then your spray gun is contaminated. The "fisheye flow out" additive is basically silicone. I've been spraying nitrocellulose for about 33 years, and fortunately, with a little care, have never encountered fisheyes in my work.

On the spray to help prevent drum sander paper from clogging, I recently heard that if you mist water on the more resinous woods before sending it thru the sander, it helps prevent build up. I've also noticed light cuts and a faster feed helps. Anything that helps prevent the heat build up that cooks the resins on the paper. I'm going to try misting water next time I run rosewood thru my sander.
 

Bill Boehme

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Hijacking thread warning!!! Speaking of lubricants; anyone have thoughts on something one could spray/ apply to a drum sander paper to help avoid build up from oily hardwoods??

How about the crepe rubber sticks that look like an oversized ArtGum eraser. HERE is one that I randomly picked from a Google search for "sanding belt cleaning stick.
 
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Hijacking thread warning!!! Speaking of lubricants; anyone have thoughts on something one could spray/ apply to a drum sander paper to help avoid build up from oily hardwoods??
I recently ran some white pine through my drum sander and of course the pine pitch gummed up the paper so I tried the "sanding belt cleaning stick" that B B mentioned above and it did not work at all. I had previously tried it to remove build up as you mentioned with the same dismal result.
 
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Hijacking thread warning!!! Speaking of lubricants; anyone have thoughts on something one could spray/ apply to a drum sander paper to help avoid build up from oily hardwoods??
Have you thought of trying PAM cooking spray (or if you have the right kind of shops around, Mo-Deck, Sno-Jet, Hedge-Pro, Mud-Slide brands of no-stick spray lube... all those are pretty much the same formulas) I haven't yet but then I have not needed to, but that's the first thing that comes to mind that might possibly work (keeps snow from sticking to front loader bucket when using it in winter to plow snow, and the spray actually does dry after a time.)

Only downside to these is, earlier in this thread, and back on topic- mentions potential issues with finishes when using silicone based lubricants, and I wonder if this stuff might have a similar issue if it gets into the wood....
 
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I do have the rubber “eraser“ sticks; they are no match for Bloodwood! Using it after several passes became challenging/ time consuming. I might try spraying something just to see. My thought on wood contamination would be, the last few light passes would be spray free. I’m getting ready to run a bunch; I will report back!
 

odie

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I recently ran some white pine through my drum sander and of course the pine pitch gummed up the paper so I tried the "sanding belt cleaning stick" that B B mentioned above and it did not work at all. I had previously tried it to remove build up as you mentioned with the same dismal result.

Don.....Have you found anything that does work?

I use the rubber erasers quite a bit on sanding belts and discs, but if that doesn't work, I've found nothing that does. The eraser at worst, does remove some of the build up, but not all of it. The belts and discs are still usable for some time after that, though. It's only a few kinds of woods that are a problem.

-----odie-----
 
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odie

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Note: I've made up a little magnetic "kit" using a my rag brush, and a little vial of graphite powder for slicking up the bedways. This is working out nicely for me. The kit attaches to the end of the right side of the lathe. When I decide to add a little graphite to the bedways, I can do it in about 30 seconds time! It's quick and easy...

-----odie-----
 
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