David Linden

Palm root bowl

Palm bowl, 8.5" x 4", taken from the root/stem junction.

Palm root bowl
David Linden, Nov 30, 2009
    • David Linden
      Palm "wood" is a difficult material to work with, consisting of sponge and wire. I used most of a two-oz. bottle of thin ca glue to hold the roots together and harden the rest of the surface. I also spent a band saw blade cutting through the roots. The final shaping was done with 36-grit paper by necessity, then sanded through the grit sequence to 600. A thin piece of persimmon (a remnant of the glue block) was left on the foot. All comments welcome.
    • George Foweraker
      Very nice and unusual well done.

      Regards George
    • Angelo
      Excellent use of the material. So unusual, I'd call it a keeper

      Angelo
    • Hal Taylor
      The amount of work put in really speaks well. Interesting and unique. Thanks for sharing.
    • Ron Wehde
      David, I think this piece looks terrific! As long as the end product looks like this then sandpaper is great. Nice job.
    • Joe Greiner
      Extremely well done. Palm seems to be more of a grass than wood, and for turning, close to celery. Wow!
    • Don Leydens
      Glad you went through the trouble of making this piece. Such unusual wood and a real pleasure to look at.
      Don L.
    • Scott Regenbogen
      That is REALLY cool and unusual. I like seeing things that surprise me and this one is great! Thanks
    • Larry Bourdeau
      All your hard work was rewarded with this piece. Great Job and a real one of a kind!
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    David Linden
    Date:
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