Beginners articles or questions

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by john lucas, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. Ruth Niles

    Ruth Niles

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    I was in no way talking down to you nor "getting uptight" and would not think of discouraging anyone! I was seriously asking questions regarding how newbie you are and what you are looking for in beginner articles. Knowing this info would help all of us direct you to articles in magazines or on the internet. If that's talking down to you, I sincerely apologize for asking for more info. :eek:

    I have no "turning status", 18 yrs. standing at a lathe means nothing as far as status or all around ability. I'm a "NEWBIE" at any enhancements, turning square (never did it), pepper mills (never turned one)........my point is I totally understand how you feel.

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with asking the AAW to include certain articles, I've done it myself. I also never said you were wrong to ask. A magazine geared for beginners of any and all aspects of turning, does not seem like a bad idea to me, either. Even after turning a lot of years, I would need and like to see beginner articles for myself. I feel like a total clutz with any artistic turning, I'm just starting to do hollow forms and they aren't very pretty. I AGREE with you, honest. :)

    Maybe it's the heat and humidity but it's not fair to assume the negative first without asking "what did you mean" rather than "I resent what you said." :confused: Sorry, John Lucas, guess you read me wrong, too.......... maybe it's me..........nah, everyone jumped all over Ed Moore so guess it's my turn. :D

    Ruth Niles
     
  2. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Sorry Ruth Wasn't meaning to jump on anyone. I know you mean well and have always been helpful to other turners. I think there's just been so much negativity lately that we all sort of read the worst things into the sentences. I will try to assume the best of people from now on.
     
  3. Jeff Bower

    Jeff Bower

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    2 cents from another lurker

    I think beginner/newbie articles would/could help anyone that reads it. I've only been turning for about 1.5 years, but I learn something everytime I read anything about turning. Many times its just a reminder of something I forgot that helps me overcome an obstacle I've encountered.

    An ongoing series with editor notes stating the previous articles are available on the AAW website would help alot and then we could all read them again and again at work!! Come on you know you all would!:D
     
  4. Barbara Gill

    Barbara Gill

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    You are right John, there does seem to be a lot of negativity. I was just thinking back on the last year or so. The threads that seem to get the most attention are the ones that include complaints: the Journal is late, the Journal is damaged, there is too much art, there is not enough basic information, there should be censorship, there should not be censorship, etc. Of course discussion is good to a point but what happens is some people get offended and pretty soon it turns into an argument and name calling. Ruth's post is a good example. She asked some pointed questions that would direct the conversation to what is "beginner" material. The next thing you know rather than just answering the questions Garmer is taking offense. Ruth is probably one of the kindest people I know.

    Questions usually indicate a request for further information in order to be able to continue discussion.
     
  5. Joe Greiner

    Joe Greiner

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    Author's Guidelines

    Proposed Sticky: Author's Guidelines
    http://www.woodturner.org/products/aw/guidelines.cfm

    I'd glimpsed this link in one of the recent posts, and promptly forgot where it was. Took eons to find it again. With all the sturm und drang about beginners articles, it might be good to have the author's guidelines easier to find, within the forum.

    Joe
     
  6. Barbara Gill

    Barbara Gill

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    Good Link. I tried to get "sturm und drang" translated but the answer (storm and penetrated) didn't make much sense. What does it mean Joe?:)
     
  7. david demascal

    david demascal

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    ruth i'm a newbie to turning. 2 years going on 100 useable bowls later many other projects completed. over 20 years on and off as woodworker. i turn in the green no great claims to fame. i'm a pro at using a chain saw many people ask same questios over and over about sharpening or using saw dosen't bother me abit thats part of being a pro. turning has become a passion for me lately. just ordered some new tools for hollowing can't wait to get turning' trial and error love it builds character. like to see more comments from begginers i have rikon 70-100 12" swing lathe i'm happy with it dose the job. i've got some ugly bowls and candlesticks but they sell go figure. 5 yrs down the road who nose i"ll call myself a begginer
     
  8. Barry Elder

    Barry Elder

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    I feel this is a very valid discussion where everyone should feel free to make suggestions and voice their opinions without anyone (ANYONE) taking offense. If we are trying to improve the forum, the website, the Journal, then let's do it.

    My suggestion would be that maybe having a "Beginner's Section" on the AAW Website would be more appropriate and would be available when needed to many more people than would the AAW Journal. This Section could possibly include very, very basic items concerning tools, lathes, safety, sharpening, burning, texturing, shops, books, etc. As has been stated, everyone's idea of a "newby" is different. So, someone who knows website organization could codify different articles into groups to help those who search for specific items. Would it not be more efficient, i.e., less expensive than putting several hundred articles in the Journal? Just a guess!

    I just last week purchased an iron to practice burning. Have not even plugged it in yet, and though I have soldered thousands of electronic parts, I am the epitome of a "newby" as concerns woodburning. The same term applies to me when discussing any form of embellishment for wood. That is why I spend quite a bit of time on forums and at the library searching for articles to get me started.

    Thanks for starting this thread and I'd like to know what everyone else thinks, so keep it up! We'll only get better!
     
  9. david demascal

    david demascal

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    don't have to offend anyone i thought we were all proffesionals . i'm just begging to understand how a new family "turners" can get along. don't be afraid to ask a question there are no stupid questions. begginers or not where here to advance forward and to bring the less experianced up to a level of better understanding.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2008
  10. Joe Greiner

    Joe Greiner

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    Idioms don't seem to translate very well as independent words. I'd always thought it meant something like "thunder and lightning" (Oops. That's Donder und Blitzen), but our friend wikipedia says otherwise: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturm_und_Drang - "Storm and stress." Serves me right; I really should look this stuff up before using it. And the phrase is in my English paper dictionary too.:eek:

    Joe
     
  11. Marc Ruby

    Marc Ruby

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    From a recovering newbie

    I guess I don't understand the logic of that. Here folks are advocating that clubs require AAW membership, and one of the primary benefits for the beginner is a magazine that, self-confessedly, isn't intended for them until they have a few years under their belt. And always arrives after the stores get theirs. Of course, the AAW could offer 'non-subscribing' memberships.

    Fine Woodworking isn't just an inspirational magazine. They put plenty of print into ideas, jigs, and projects. For all that the advocate the use of hand tools, they support improvement of the craft at all levels. And they come out 6 times a year. I wish that the AAW would spend a wee bit less on production and put it into larger, more frequesnt issues.

    I simply think (as someone who only recently got over being a newbie) that a mix is appropriate. And there is no skill that I have that couldn't be improved considerably. Oddly enough, it isn't my design skills that are weak, but my ability to execute. Perhaps uninspiring articles could be labelled 'for noviices only.'

    Marc


     
  12. Marc Ruby

    Marc Ruby

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    Right on.

    This is a pretty good idea. I still need to convince you that it is possible to write an article on taking a gouge through the trip from edge to center, but right now this minute I could use some help finding the best way to make that same gouge turn a large, ornery burl bowl blank - outside or inside.

     
  13. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Marc I'm turning a small oinery piece today. It's a nearly rotten piece of Locust. I started to throw it out but then realized it had some nice character, was small and wouldn't take a whole lot of time to turn. Wrong on that one. The cracks were worse than I though and I wanted to turn it thin so I had to fill some of them. There was a rotten limb in it so I will be leaving the big hole in the side where that was.
    To keep the tearout down I had to coat parts of it with thinned lacquer and some really bad areas with thin CA glue. Then I resharpened my 1/2" Taylor gouge that I ground in a Stewart Batty 40 degree grind and took off another .010" or so. That took care of 90 percent of the tearout so I did the same thing again and then started sanding at 180 grit.
    Now I'm hollowing the inside. I hollowed the first inch or so last night. I'm going to check it when I get home and decide if it needs to be thinner. It's about 1/8" now. I'm trying a new Hunter tool that is really nice. It's not the best tool for hollowing this type of vessel but I had to use it, it's a new toy. I'm using mostly homemade hollowing tools for this project.
     
  14. Marc Ruby

    Marc Ruby

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    I'll try that.

    I hadn't considered soaking in lacquer, since this piece is pretty solid, but it might help with tearout so I'll give it a try. I'm using the big Ellsworth gouge and to lesser Sorby;s all ground to the Ellsworth profile. Usually thay can eat anything including ebony, but this has gotten them beat. I don't remember the name of the wood (it's at home) but it's scary heavy.

    Marc

     
  15. john lucas

    john lucas

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    Marc I forgot to answer your other questions. Sorry. The simpler projects in the Journal can easily be done by a beginner, even one with little experience. It just takes more patience than someone with more skill. The biggest problem I see that beginners have is tool control and that only comes with practice. It't the kind of thing that's hard to put in works, hands on preferably with a skilled turner standing by is the best way. I do realize that a step by step photo guide would be a good way to do these articles but that takes more space and more money. Also there are 10 tools and probably a dozen ways to turn a cove. In an article you can really only show 1 way. I know Woodturning Design does it and so does Woodturning but they don't have to do all of the different article American Woodturner does. It's kind of one of those catch22 things. If you do really long detailed articles for one group you alienate another. If you do nothing but high end articles then you alienate another. I'm glad I only do the tips pages and don't have to make those decisions.
    The AAW is looking at doing 6 issues. One problem you face is getting the articles. This is reader written for the most part so that means a bunch more volunteers to write articles.
    As far as the magazine getting to the shelves before we get it. That happens for every magazine I get. It's always been frustrating because I can thumb through Fine Woodworking or Wood magazine before I even get it. It has something to do with how they mail the magazines and apparenlty there isn't anything that can be done about it because that's been a complaint ever since I started getting woodworking magazines.
     
  16. Brujo

    Brujo

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    Seems to me there are plenty of beginner articles (and room for many more) in the members only area.

    I just downloaded a great set of articles on sharpening! If sharpening ain't at the beginning I must be doing something wrong.

    I honestly think there is a good mix of beginner articles and stuff way over my head in the journal. I actually feel most the how to articles are for the beginner, its the photo galleries that only show advanced stuff!

    I would love to see a list of all the articles that have been published in the last 5 years. I'll bet a third are for the beginner.
     
  17. Ed Davidson

    Ed Davidson

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    This is a re-print, from another thread:

    Here's an excerpt from the AW page:

    "The AAW has long been blessed with talented and loyal members who submit articles and photos for publication in the journal. We are now able to pay members $100 per published page for how-to and techniques articles. Submissions to American Woodturner are encouraged. Please contact the editor with articles or proposals."

    Aspiring authors...dial in here to get some info on how it's done: http://www.woodturner.org/products/aw/guidelines.cfm
     
  18. Ed Davidson

    Ed Davidson

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    All of these past AW articles are available online to AAW members, and are generally intended for novice and beginners:

    A Mace for Graduation Cooper, Gerald Summer 2002
    An Amazing Finish Haskell, Bill Winter 2002
    Automotive Gizmo Makes Low-cost Chuck Cohen, Andy Winter 2000
    Building & Growing an AAW Chapter Hill, John Winter 2003
    Determining Bowl Thickness Harper, Abe Summer 1996
    Evaluating Wood Art Wallace, Kevin Winter 2002
    Feel-Good Stocking Stuffers Hartmann-Hurt, Rus Winter 1995
    Finding Your Own Voice Zeff, Gary A. Fall 2003
    Finishing Secrets Fairfield, Russ Fall 1998
    First Newsletter Newsletter (Original) June 1986
    Five Ways to Avoid a Catch Jamieson, Lyle Spring 1996
    Gallery Game Brennion, Phil Fall 2006
    Inexpensive Air Filter Rosand, Robert Fall 1997
    Introduction to Chucking Smith, Peter M. Summer 1995
    Learn to Shapen Progressively Lacer, Alan Fall 2003
    Learn to Shapen Progressively, pt2 Lacer, Alan Winter 2003
    Mission Accomplished Rinde, Jim Fall 2005
    Natural Edges Johnston, Bill Fall 1994
    Plagerism, Copying, & Influences Vesery, Jacques Fall 2005
    Play Ball Roberts, Gary Spring 2005
    Pleasing Profiles Nittmann, David Fall 2006
    Point-to-Point Hoover, Bruce Fall 2000
    Raw Beauty from a Basic 2 x 4 Ramsey, Dave Summer 2003
    Shaping and Sharpening Ellsworth, David Spring 2001
    Side-Ground Gouges Jordan, John Spring 1994
    Side-Grounded Pratt, Phil Spring 1997
    Skewing a Bead Hatfield, George Winter 1996
    Smoking Pots Brennion, Phil Spring 2000
    Spalted Maple Vessel Hasiak, Larry Winter 1998
    Speed Zone Lacer, Alan Spring 2004
    Techniques for Carving Heiple, King Spring 2001
    Texas Big Bug Tolly, Johnny Spring 2000
    The Art of Crtique Christiansen, Jim Spring 2004
    The Cutting Process Hatfield, George Summer 1999
    Tuning Up Your Lathe Stubbs, Del Spring 1995
    Turned Relief Brown, Andrew Summer 2006
    Turned Wood Now Nelson, Russ Spring 1998
    Turning Collection Plates Jones, Wes Fall 2002
    Turnings of the Erzgebirge Lacer, Alan Spring 1999
    Two-Bit Project Cook, Nick Fall 2005
    Wine-Bottle Stoppers Cook, Nick Winter 1996
    Wood as Canvas Zeff, Gary A. Summer 1994
     
  19. Marc Ruby

    Marc Ruby

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    It can be done.

    I was thinking you could just dive deep on one form, say a simple, rounded bowl. And a single tools - say a 1/2 inch Ellsworth grind. Follow the rough and finish cuts through. Maybe one or two alternatives.

    Then article two takes a shape variation or two and talks about what to do to accomodate them. You might discuss a grind variation.

    Then an article on bowl gouge grinds in general. Now you've got a guy who has a couple of basic forms to work with and a clearer knowledge of a particular tool. It may take him months to absorb it all, but heck, it's months between issues, anyway.

     
  20. Ruth Niles

    Ruth Niles

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    Barry wrote: ....... "My suggestion would be that maybe having a "Beginner's Section" on the AAW Website would be more appropriate and would be available when needed to many more people than would the AAW Journal. This Section could possibly include very, very basic items concerning tools, lathes, safety, sharpening, burning, texturing, shops, books, etc....... Would it not be more efficient, i.e., less expensive than putting several hundred articles in the Journal? Just a guess!"
    *************
    Barry, that is a great idea. My personal "newbie" status would be made a lot easier with some basic burning techniques and tools. I can only keep magazines so long and they have to be tossed, but having all the info here would be like having a personal magazine rack on my computer. :)

    Ruth
     

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