First Bowl

Discussion in 'Woodturning Discussion Forum' started by Lamar Wright, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hello turners, after a month of reading, watching utube video's and getting great advice from fellow wood turners I turned my first green bowl yesterday. The bowl is of Maple from a tree that was harvested last week from a two acre clearing for a new home a couple of miles from me. The owner was a friend and he gave me several small logs of the maple.

    The bowl is 7" OD and just a simple design. I turned it a little thick to allow for movement as the bowl goes through it drying process. On the bottom of the bowl where I turned the mortise the wood was a little stringy? Is the normal for green wood? I was very satisfied with the turning. I put the bowl in a paper bag and put the date and type of wood on the bag. My next project is to get a dried bowl blank and turn is so I'll have a finished bowl.
    Cook Woods is one of the many wood suppliers that was suggested so I will probably order from them......Happy turning!
     
  2. charlie knighton

    charlie knighton

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    Free green wood is the best....IMO
     
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  3. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    Freshly cut maple can be s bit stringy. Keep the tool sharp and remove wood fibers that ball up and keep the tool from cutting. The rough turning should be about ¾ to 1 inch thick.
     
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  4. Fadi Zeidan

    Fadi Zeidan

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    Congrats on your first bowl :) I am still a newbie so I can relate.

    I made a list of wood blank sources, I usually buy from the first one or from eBay but I now look for free wood because buying adds up quickly as you start turning more. Not to mention, you are limited on sizes when you buy.

    http://www.aawforum.org/community/index.php?threads/wood-blanks-sources.12462/

    I also dry the green wood faster using "DNA bath", you can google it, I had great success with this method. It is not for high volume, but if you only do few here and there, it speeds up the process.
     
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  5. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    CraigsList usually posts free wood every day when someone is cutting down a tree
    or cleaning out the garage or shop. If you plan ahead and collect some green wood
    and process it into turning blanks you can provide an endless supply of turning blanks
    in a couple of years. It takes a year or two or more to properly dry turning blanks depending
    on what you are making. When harvesting green wood you want to process the logs and
    cut them to size and seal the end grain as quickly as possible to avoid the cracking and checking
    of the end grain of the wood blanks. Finding large sized turning blanks can be a challenge and
    when you find them they are either green wood needing to dry or fairly expensive. Another option
    in most area's are regional saw mill owners that slab trees with portable saw mills. Many of these
    companies also cut and process logs into large dimension timbers and various sized billets for a
    variety of uses. Local tree cutters are another good resource to partner with.
     
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  6. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    I agree Charlie.
    Great tip Bill, I left an inch on the bowl. I cleaned up the fibers this morning. About how long does it take a green maple bowl to dry enough to finish? The bowl is in a paper bag and humidity is kept at 60 percent.
     
  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Thanks for the tip on drying Fadi, I'll sure give it a try. Also thanks for the wood blank sources.
    Hi Mike, very good tips. Mike, do you seal your green wood with a product called Ancorseal, I think that is how it is spelled? I've read where some people seal with white acrylic paint to ck cracking. There is a sawmill about 12 miles from me. I know the saw pine and I'll ck and see if they process hard wood as well.
     
  8. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Congratulations! For drying bowls.
    Anchor seal,works great but slows the drying more than the paper bag method.

    Using paper bags be sure to change damp bags for dry ones everyday for 5-7 days until the bags are dry to the touch. Damp bags become mold factories. If you see any mold on the bowl wipe it wit clorox and discard the bags it came out of.

    After the bags are dry to the touch I put the bagged bowl on a shelf for 4 months. Then take it out of the bags and finish drying on a shelf.
    A 7" bowl at 3/4" wall thickness would likely be returnable in 6 months total time.
    A 1" thick bowl 8-10 months to dry.
    With anchor seal it has always taken my bowls about 11-12 months to dry.

    In a 60% RH environment the wood will dry to about 11%MC.
    At 50% RH the wood will dry to about 9% MC

    If you are in a hurry the 7" bowl would be a easy to microwave dry in a day.

    Consider turning a green bowl to finish.

    If you get it a 1/4" thick it will dry within a week to finish.
    I turn these bows with the rim to the bark so when they warp the rim will be waved.
    Bowls with rims toward the center of the tree will warp with two peaks at the end grain end that I don't care for.
     
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  9. Mike Johnson

    Mike Johnson

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    Lamar,

    I usually use hot melted canning wax to seal end grain on the wood blanks.
    I use an old "Fry Daddy" oil cooker and keep several blocks of canning wax in the cooker.
    When I need to seal wood, I plug in the cooker and adjust the thermostat and the wax is
    ready in several minutes and I can dip the ends of the smaller blanks into the cooker or use
    a small wood handle brush to brush the hot wax onto the end grain. Some woods require a
    second application when using a brush to apply the seal. Depending on the wood type and
    the moisture content the end grain will absorb the hot melted wax. Ancorseal works fine, the
    hot wax requires no clean-up of the brush since I leave it in the cooker and put the cover on
    when done. I have also used latex paint on freshly cut logs, this also requires several coats
    to get a good seal. When I process the logs into the desired blanks I usually then apply the
    hot wax on the end grain. Wax or Ancorseal is the better option for sealing end grain.
     
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  10. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Al, I will be sure and check the bags for moisture . The bowl is in a bag on a shelf in my shop. I'm in the shop every day so I'll be able to keep a close eye on it. Thanks on the tips Al and happy turning.
     
  11. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Mike, thanks for the waxing tip. I'll get some canning wax to use on the end grain. We have a Fry Daddy that we never use so it will be perfect for sealing end grain. Thanks again Mike and happy turning.
     
  12. Hy Tran

    Hy Tran

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    No photos, didn't happen :D

    I've had problems with green (silver) maple and tearout as the grain changes direction. In dry maple, my technique is apparently good enough (or my tools sharp enough) that I don't have nearly as much tearout.
     
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  13. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hello Hy, I made some pictures of the bowl since it was my first and I'll post them here of the forum soon as I sort out how to do that on this forum. I posted photos all the time on the Pen Turners forum of my pens so it should not be that difficult to post here.
    Yes, my tearout is on the bottom and rim of the bowl. Was very excited on my first bowl the way it turned out, (no pun intended lol) now to turn a lot more!
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
  14. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hello turners, here are photos of my first green rough turned bowl as promised.

    IMG_0143.JPG IMG_0144.JPG IMG_0145.JPG
     
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  15. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Pretty good for a first bowl.

    Looks like you are doing some scraping to get the long strings.
    Scraping dry wood works better than scraping green wood.
    Scraping is ok but I always get a cleaner surface cutting with a gouge with the bevel riding than I get scraping.

    I Rough turn bowls using a 1/2" bowl gouge (5/8" diameter bar) with the Ellsworth grind.
    Many grinds in bowl gouges can be used successfully to make smooth bevel riding cuts.

    last January I did a demo "working with green wood" I roughed a green bowl for drying and then mounted and turned a dried bowl. The green bowl I roughed was red maple one of the soft maples.

    I don't get the long strings because I cut the fibers with supported by longer fibers behind them.

    Roughing green bowl -

    View: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lo0bGSafZq4
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
  16. odie

    odie

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    Lamar.......You're right......lots of "stringiness" there. Gotta start somewhere, so hang in there. It will get better with practice. My first thought is your tool could be a little sharper.....Was that done with a gouge, or scraper? There is no reason why that can't turn out to be a very nice bowl. Take your time with the seasoning process, and make sure it's stabilized to the ambient atmosphere. Time to mount up some kiln dried wood, and pass the time working with that.......:D

    -----odie-----
     
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  17. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Odie, thank you very much for your valued reply. Tool of choice was my 1/2" bowl gouge and a scraper. I put an Ellsworth grind on my gouge for the first time and think I need some work on the grind. i don't think the gouge is sharp enough. Yes Odie, I plan on turning a lot of kiln dried wood and practice making a lot of bowls. Thanks for your tips and happy turning, by the way, I really like your bowl designs and finish!
     
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  18. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Al, thanks so much for the video and i have bookmarked it and can follow your turning of a green bowl. As I told Odie, I'm going to turn a lot of kiln dried for a while and practice on my bowls. Happy turning.
     
  19. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

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    Lamar,
    I would encourage you to turn green wood if you have sources.
    Your green bowl is a good start. If you believe your next turning will be better than the last every bowl you do will be better.

    Green wood is so much more fun to turn that dry wood.
    Green wood is essentially free after you buy the truck, trailer and chainsaw.
    You can cut quite a few blanks with a bow saw in a morning.

    As your gouge skills improve you will get smooth surfaces with no strings attached. :)

    Have you connected with the Alabama Woodturner's? A little coaching can improve your tool usage in a hurry.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
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  20. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

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    Hi Al, I have all three, truck, trailer and chainsaw. There are plenty of resources to green wood in my area. There is a friend of mine (a fellow pen turner) who started turning bowls and platters couple years ago who is helping me also. Jim is the one that turned my interest into turning other things than just pens.

    I have plenty of green Red Maple logs to cut and practice on so I'll be making shavings for a while. Happy turning and thanks so much for your tips Al. I'll be posting on my progress with photo's and welcome any advice.
     
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