Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Discussion in 'Tutorials and Tips' started by odie, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. odie

    odie

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    Useful shop gadgets. Shop, and "evolving shop" photos. Lathe tidbits.

    Just thought I'd start a thread with photos of different shops, shop photos of "then and now"......along with photos of useful shop gadgets and lathe discussion. Any photos and/or "shop talk" is what's being sought in this thread......for general interest sake. Please feel free to participate.

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    This is a clean up dust pan that I've been using for a few weeks, and have been very impressed with it's usefulness in cleaning up my shop. It has a couple gallon capacity bucket and the long handle saves all that bending over I've been doing with a regular dust pan......I ain't getting any younger, and this is really helpful to me!

    Update: April 14, 2013.......this huge scoop dustpan is fantastic! I'm using it all the time. odie

    For years, I've also been using a garden rake and snow shovel for the really big piles of lathe shavings, but this new gadget is going to replace all that! It can set on the floor by itself while you sweep shavings into it.....as you sweep chips into the front with both hands on the broom. When the bucket is full, grab the handle and dump a couple gallons of chips into the trash can. This makes for fast work of the job.....

    The bucket has a hinge on it, but I haven't seen the need for that feature yet......maybe someone else will find that useful. I keep it locked into place as shown.

    It was purchased at Home Depot for $18.....wish I had something like this years ago.:cool2:

    ooc
     

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  2. odie

    odie

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    Here is "evolution" in progress!

    This is a rolling cart I originally purchased around 2005, or so. It's intended purpose is for automotive use, holding tools while rolling up under the hood of a vehicle. I use it for lathe tool storage, lathe accessories, sanding supplies, etc.

    The three photos show the evolution of this cart over the years, as it's been modified a number of times to better adapt to my needs. The added shelf holds my "sanding caddies", and the pvc tubes on the end hold cut sandpaper strips.

    ===================

    This is intended to be a thread for discussing and showing photos of general tips and useful shop/lathe information, just for the fun of it. Any and all "shop talk" is welcome and promoted. :D

    ooc
     

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  3. odie

    odie

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    My Mother was a career school teacher, and this old paper cutter was given to me by her.....God bless her soul! It has been extremely useful to me for cutting sandpaper strips, and now I can't live without it! ;)

    It's an antique and dated in the early 1950's.......1952, if I recall correctly.

    I store 10-20 pre-cut sandpaper strips in the pvc tubes on the far end of the rolling mechanic's cart shown in the previous post.......

    ooc
     

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  4. Syd Sellers

    Syd Sellers

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    Space saver.

    Odie, I would like to show you a huge space saver for your saw top and benches. I made this up to put my tools in and keep them close.
    It's basically a lazy Susan on growth hormones. The top turns free of the bottom. Both trays spin, so finding a tool is a snap. After putting your tools in in the order you like them, it becomes easy to remember where they are.
    Details on how to make this are available...
     

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  5. odie

    odie

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    Hi Syd........

    I believe I've seen your "lazy Susan", or one just like it before. No doubt about it, that is one terrific idea, for sure. :D

    The lazy Susan idea is something I might have done a few years ago, and if I was not already accustomed to the way I organize my tools the way I do. It's an idea that many other turners will benefit by considering it.....and using it. One very positive aspect of both yours and my methods is neither is in a place that isn't easily re-positioned if the need arises.......that is something others who permanently affix their tool storage to the wall, can't do very easily.

    The way I organize my tools wasn't really a planned thing.......but, more of an evolutionary process for me. I have four places that I store tools......and their accessibility is a matter of how much any particular tool is used. Your method would undoubtedly be the best overall choice, if I were someone looking to find the right, or a better solution for that need. Since my solution works for me, I'm happy with it......but, there are many new turners who frequent these AAW forums, and the lazy Susan is a real good option to consider......thanks for introducing it to the thread.

    I have four places of lathe tool storage. The Delta saw table top auxiliary table is where the tools currently in use are put. The rolling cart has tools that are frequently used, but not necessarily at the moment. The tools stored next to the 10" wet grinder (which I no longer use......it's been removed to clear the table top of needed space.....anyone want to buy that cheap?!) are tools that are used only occasionally. There is a little trough made from a lengthwise cut piece of pvc pipe right on the lathe bedways.....this is good for setting down a tool only momentarily while I do something else.

    There is a drawer that holds about 25 tools that are almost never used. I might try to sell some of these someday. Some are well used, but some are nearly new.

    Thanks for contributing to the discussion, Syd........:D

    ooc
     

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  6. Bill Boehme

    Bill Boehme Administrator Staff Member

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    .... but where is the ON-OFF switch and the power cord? :D
     
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  7. AlanZ

    AlanZ

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    ".... but where is the ON-OFF switch and the power cord?"

    Bill, you're livin' in the past. Dust collection has evolved.

    Odie got the new cordless model.

    What I don't see, is the laser...
     
  8. odie

    odie

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    You guys are a couple of cards! Heh,heh,heh! :D

    The power cord is still there, just in a different location.......I opted out of the laser option when I got this one!

    This Shop-Vac is a new addition to my shop. It replaced an old Craftsman shop vacuum I've had for about thirty years.......which died a few years ago. I got really tired of just cleaning up where a broom and rake could reach!

    The broom and dustpan will probably never be replaced for the big piles of shavings........these are things that modern technology hasn't managed to replace on a layman's budget......yet!

    Have a good day Gents.......and ladies!

    Grab your cameras, and show us something neat about your shop..........! :cool2:

    ooc
     

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  9. ray hampton

    ray hampton

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  10. odie

    odie

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    Here are a couple of depth drills. I use these to drill a hole into the interior of bowl blocks, so that I don't get carried away and hog out the interior too deep. There are two sizes here......3/8" and 3/16" diameter drills.

    The 3/8" hole is the best overall, because the bottom of the hole is better visualized while the wood is spinning. Both do, but the 3/16" hole tends to clog up more often, giving the false impression that the bottom of the hole has been reached, but hasn't. On some pieces, the smaller hole is the best option, but evaluation is necessary to determine that.

    I have installed a steel rod perpendicular to the wooden handle of the 3/8" depth drill. After having the handle spin in my hands a couple of times, I decided to do this modification that allows a better two handed grip. Loosing control of the depth drill can happen with wet wood which creates wet shavings that can expand with heat and stick the drill solid. Since doing this modification, I've never had this problem again. I don't recall this ever happening with the 3/16" depth drill, but has happened on occasion with the 3/8" depth drill. The best way to drill is to drill down in increments, while backing out to expel the shavings built up in the flutes. Careful, not to back the drill all the way out, because re-entering a partially drilled hole can get a bit tricky with a hand held drill bit......

    Conceptually, a depth drill is nothing new to the woodturning world. I realize, of course, that many other turners are using depth drills to indicate when to stop hogging out the interior of bowls........but, the wooden drill stop modification is my little invention! Drill stops are nothing new, but my way of doing it is unique to me. As you can see, I've used a large dowel section for the stop. I'm using a thumb screw hose clamp instead of the usual set screw. On the end of the dowel, I've cut an "X" pattern on the band saw......this allows for the wood to contract around the drill bit via the hose clamp, and locking it into place. (Using the standard set screw in the flutes will damage the flutes, and prevent smooth flow of chips through the flutes. Once or twice might not be that much of a consideration, but with a drill bit that uses a stop repeatedly, again and again, it will eventually become an issue.)

    On the other end of the dowel, the wood is recessed at a 45 degree angle to the center hole. This allows for shavings to not interfere with the proper drill depth of the tool.

    Recommended rpm is around 500-600 for drilling depth holes.

    When necessary, these drill bits can be re-sharpened with a 600gt diamond hone. I wouldn't know for sure, but I'd imagine one of these long drill bits are good for a lifetime of use, used for a singular purpose like depth drill on bowls.......I've never needed to replace one, but I have re-sharpened a few times! :cool2:

    ooc
     

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  11. odie

    odie

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    The Versa-Cal calipers are very handy, because it only takes one hand to use them.

    Like most of us, we've been using the double ended calipers for quite a few years, or decades. The trouble with standard double ended calipers is it takes two hands to use them. When I saw the Versa-Cal calipers first hit the market, I didn't know how well they would work. I decided to get the bigger version and try them out.......they work just as advertised, and being a "one handed" caliper was such an improvement, I was hooked on the concept!

    I almost bought the smaller version of the Versa-Cal, but decided to try and convert my old style double ended calipers to work like the Versa-Cal. After the conversion, I am happy with how it works. It works just as well as the "store bought" item, and I saved myself some money by doing the conversion. I originally used two aluminum strips, but that didn't work out very well for my hand.......the bent aluminum rod was modified to adjust the width, and this was a success! Sometimes that's just the way things are......."If at first you don't succeed......try, try again!".......:D:D

    The conversion is self explanatory, with the photo.

    ooc
     

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  12. Glen Perye

    Glen Perye

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    The first two are some sanding sticks I made up for the bench jewelers course I took. They are scrap acrylic with assorted papers either glued or rubber banded to the sticks. Paint stirring sticks work well too.

    The third photo is a toggle clamp that holds sheet metal or other sheet goods thin plastic, brass, aluminum veneer for segmenting pen blanks or cutting discs out of material. It will keep the figers from getting chewed up if the drill sticks in the material.

    Fourth photo is deli waxed paper sheets good for glue ups, mixing small amounts of paint they come in a number of sizes and from 250 to 500 pcs. in the box. I get them at Gordon food service stores but any restaurant supply will have them.

    The fifth one is some attachments for the shop vac from Lowes. Good for keyboards, computers and other limited access areas that could collect sawdust or other stuff
     

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  13. Glen Perye

    Glen Perye

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    Another useful item from the old hard drive.
    First photo was a rare earth magnet glued to the bottom of the altoids tin to keep small bits and bobs handy near the machines.
    Photo 2 is the hard drive magnets, #3 is some screwed to the peg board behind the lathe, holding drive centers and allen wrenches.
    Photo 4 is a couple on a dust/shaving pick up.
    Photo 5 on the lathe holds great and yet east to move with out tools.
     

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  14. Glen Perye

    Glen Perye

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    1st photo is is the round version of the cracker savers, they don't help much with keeping crackers fresh but the will keep the curd and dust off the drill chucks and other tooling and the come in square too. I put the cut up strips of sand paper in one.
    2nd and 3rd photo's is a thread checker from ENCO, both metric and standard common sized fine and coarse threads. It will check nuts and bolts.
    4th and 5th photos are what I did to get the spring clamps out of the way. some dowel stock/broom handle/pvc pipe some long screws short sections of pipe. screwed into floor/ceiling joists
     

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  15. odie

    odie

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    Thanks, Glen.......

    I'm going to borrow a couple of your ideas for my own use! :D

    ooc
     
  16. Glen Perye

    Glen Perye

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    That why they are posted, will have to readjust some other photos so they fit this site.
    Here are a couple more
    1st Photo a shop made fence for the Royobi 9" band saw a cheap bar clamp that is screwed into place so the handle can tighten it to the table, Then a piece of wood is mounted to provide a continuous surface, if you will be using it a lot you can use some of that slide tape they sell.
    2nd Is another view of the fence and my sliding table rig, 3rd is the blade slot.
    4th is something that was on every hose of shop vacs. This one has a ring that you can use to adjust the amount of suction at the end of the attachments. Using the plaster sanding tank attachment requires a lower suction. If you put your own hole in a fitting you can cover it with duct tape to reduce the suction.
    5th one are clearance sale poly cutting boards, a lot cheaper than the stock from WC or other suppliers.
     

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  17. Angelo

    Angelo President Emeritus

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    Workspace

    Attached are two photos of my 1224 workspace as it existed in my basement. It now resides in a rented Mill Space in pretty much the same form

    I found that the 1224's top (beneath the ways) was too narrow for my purposes and way of working. So I built a little shelf to keep my tools from slipping off the lathe. The shelf also has some storage space for projects and a light

    The wider shot shows the tool racks on the wall behind the lathe

    Angelo
     

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  18. odie

    odie

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    Angelo......looks like a lot of thought went into your shop.

    Thanks for showing us.

    ooc
     
  19. Angelo

    Angelo President Emeritus

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    Just inspiration

    Just a lot of inspiration from Lyle Jamieson. He called then "tolerations" when you just keep putting up with an inferior way of doing things.

    I decided to organize my work space by eliminating "tolerations" My biggest pet peeve was having to move a tool or tools to get at the one I needed

    The mantra was if I had to move one thing to get at what I needed I was not organized enough. So what you see is the result of a lot of trial and error over the course of years

    Thanks for looking

    Angelo
     
  20. odie

    odie

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    Angelo......That "tollerations" concept is one I can completely understand. I work in an industrial shop environment, and I see first hand how other machinists organize their work space and tool boxes. It is possible to do good work with a disorganized work area, but those who do spend the effort to organize, waste less time over the course of the day. What I'm talking about here isn't "clean and neat"......I'm talking about an entire different thing: organization, and it looks like you've got a handle on that concept.

    One thing that leads to organization is a little phrase composed of three little words......"do it now"! Apply them, and your shop will eventually work better for you than you ever dreamed was possible.

    At one time or another, I'm sure all of us find ourselves saying to ourselves......"If I did this, then that task would be easier, and when I get around to it, I'll be sure to do that".

    Great.......IF you do get that "round tuit".......none of us ever find all of the "round tuits" we should have......so, the concept is a bit faulty, at best!

    "Do it now".......that's what works! :cool2:

    Do it now, even if you have to break away from something else you are currently doing.......you'll get used to the inconvenience, and you'll also be thankful you did! ;)

    DO IT NOW!......:D

    ooc



    edit: Even if you do get used to operating on the "do it now" principle, this doesn't mean you will do it in the best way, on the first attempt. You should also get used to the idea that, if it works, but could have been done a little better......just "do it now".....again......and again.....until you've got it perfected.

    I know, I know......it's really frustrating to spend all that effort to do some little improvement in the shop, and it didn't work out as well as you had hoped for. Hey, that's just life, buddy!.......and, you need to understand that Edison didn't get the light bulb invented on the first try!!!!! You should also understand that Edison probably wasn't any smarter than you and I are........only, he didn't give up, and he worked on things over, and over, and over again......until he finally got it right! :D

    ooc
     

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