1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. The forum migration is complete. We had some issues with the hosting provider and I had to restore the server a 2nd time so if you happened to post from about 9:30pm - 11pm PST your post may have been removed. Please double check to see if its still there. If you have any issues post them in the technical support forum or email the AAW Forum Staff at forum_moderator@aawforum.org. Thanks!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Face Shield

Discussion in 'Woodturning Health & Safety' started by John Walls, Jul 8, 2020.

  1. John Walls

    John Walls

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2020
    Messages:
    147
    Location (City & State):
    Larimore, ND
    I've been turning for a couple months, have a Trend airsheild. I have used it probably 90% of the time, bout the only time I have not is when turning green wood. I wear it to protect my lungs and to keep dust out of my eyes from turning. Welp, my son was visiting and wanted a demo so I was happy to do so. I was turning half a branch, maybe 6x6 piece. It was wet so I figured I was good with no mask so I could talk to him about what I was doing, kinda like a serious rookie teaching a first timer. I was atleast standing off to the side mostly, or so I thought. That darn thing came flying off in the blink of an eye. Missed my eyes and glasses, barely, did not hit my nose square on but nailed my left nostril and cheek bone with blow. OUCH, it stung, was numb for a couple minutes. It could have been worse, hit me square on the bridge/broke it, or busted my glasses, hit my eye, teeth, etc. Sure thankful for all the advice from folks about standing out of the line of fire! I told my son it was done for a teaching moment for him.... LOL, yea, for him.... he scolded me pretty good. I don't think I will ever turn on my lathe again without FIRST putting on the shield. I do need to figure out how to replaced the clear-film (?) over the shield, it is getting blurry, or, is that my eyes from getting old/tired.... LOL
     
  2. Emiliano Achaval

    Emiliano Achaval Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2015
    Messages:
    2,244
    Location (City & State):
    Maui, Hawaii
    Home Page:
    I’m glad that you are ok. Even with green wood you have dust.
     
  3. hockenbery

    hockenbery AAW Advisor Staff Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    6,585
    Location (City & State):
    Lakeland, Florida
    Home Page:
    Glad you are okay.

    in accident similar to yours,
    I saw a really good turner get hit in the face with a small piece 3x3x4 the tailstock moved, the piece hit the tool rest, and then the turners mouth.

    Had he been wearing a face shield he would have said a few words and gotten back to turning.
    Instead he went to the emergency room got 12 stiches and his teeth wired in place so he could keep them for a while.

    Of course you would never turn with the tailstock loose. Neither would he.
    He had tightened the piece between centers and the tailstock held until he turned in the lathe .
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2020
    Dennis Weiner likes this.
  4. John Torchick

    John Torchick

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Messages:
    2,657
    Location (City & State):
    Cleveland, Tennessee
    This says it all. Glad it wasn't any worse as some here can attest.
    20200213_142758 (1).jpg
     
    Lamar Wright likes this.
  5. Dennis Weiner

    Dennis Weiner

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    192
    Location (City & State):
    New City, NY
    Thanks for sharing. Glad it was minor and your ok. Every now and then, I may stray and join the no face shield crowd but your experience just reminds me to practice the safest turning procedures and protect your body against injury as best as possible.
    Woodturning is dangerous no matter how much we love it, it is important to remind ourselves that we need to reduce our risks in every way possible. Over the years, I have had several incidents. Two of which occurred far from the line of fire. Stay out of the line of fire a smart practice that reduces risk. It doesn’t eliminate it. It is safer to wear a face shield and protective gear anywhere near the lathe.
     
  6. Gary Beasley

    Gary Beasley

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2017
    Messages:
    622
    Location (City & State):
    Marietta, Georgia
    Only time I feel safe turning without a shield is when Im turning pens. Even that will sling a chip now and then if the glue fails.
     
  7. Lamar Wright

    Lamar Wright

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2017
    Messages:
    668
    Location (City & State):
    Jasper, Alabama
    glad you are OK John. I even wear my shield while sanding because you never know when a piece of wood could come loose and come straight at you.
     
  8. John Walls

    John Walls

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2020
    Messages:
    147
    Location (City & State):
    Larimore, ND
    All things considered, I was very lucky. RPM was around 600 but that is plenty fast enough to have done plenty of damage. I doubt it will ever be turned on again without a shield on. I do need to get myself a turning smock, full length to cover my feet. Even with long pants on, I am still getting shavings in my socks, you know, the ones that stay in to ich you like crazy even after a couple washes.... LOL I do wear the airpro/shield when sanding, I have a hard enough time breathing without asking for trouble.
     
  9. Dave Landers

    Dave Landers

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2014
    Messages:
    161
    Location (City & State):
    Estes Park, CO
    Home Page:
    I mostly quit wearing socks in the shop because of how much I was tracking into the house. I have a pair of crocks and a pair of old tennis shoes at the shop door that I slip on and off when I go in/out (and a pair of old boots for use with the chainsaw). Also, large door mats on either side of the shop door to collect whatever is left on my feet.
     
  10. sjbrandt

    sjbrandt

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2006
    Messages:
    8
    Location (City & State):
    Dillsburg, PA
    I’ve taken to wearing 8” high work boots at the lathe. If I tie them up to the top no chips or shavings get into them, even if I’m wearing shorts.
     
  11. William Rogers

    William Rogers

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2016
    Messages:
    593
    Location (City & State):
    Haubstadt, Indiana
    I wear my PAPR any time the lathe is on small or large turning. I am also wearing it when I operate my table saw and other power tools. PIA to put it on, but don’t want to break my habit of using it. It is comfortable enough when wearing it.
     
    Bill Boehme likes this.
  12. John Walls

    John Walls

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2020
    Messages:
    147
    Location (City & State):
    Larimore, ND
    I might have to do this, I have a couple extra pairs. Thanks for the shorts bit, I got a kick out of it visualizing shorts/boots. I do work in my shop in shorts quite a bit so I wasn't chuckling at you, but at the sight of me doing it. It does get pretty hot here in the summer, shops not air conditioned.
     
  13. John Walls

    John Walls

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2020
    Messages:
    147
    Location (City & State):
    Larimore, ND
    I think I need to get into that habbit, even with the dust collector on my table saw it creates a lot of dust. I also have my bandsaw connected to the dust collector and it still throws alot into the air. I think I probably need to put an air filter on the ceiling to help clear the air quicker, it gets pretty dusty in there at times.
     
    William Rogers likes this.
  14. Randy Anderson

    Randy Anderson

    Joined:
    May 25, 2019
    Messages:
    209
    Location (City & State):
    Eads, TN
    Home Page:
    Over my left shoulder when standing at my table saw there is a good sized chunk of jagged wood sticking out that is embedded in the door foam insulation. It goes in all the way to the metal on the outside of the door. I leave it there. A good reminder that bad stuff happens very fast. Barely missed me.
     
  15. Dave Fritz

    Dave Fritz

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Messages:
    361
    Location (City & State):
    Montfort, Wisconsin
    It seems it's only a matter of time before something or another goes south. I too had a bad catch with an easy wood carbide tool when the outside edge of the cutter made contact with the wood. I was concentrating to hard on the tiny part that was contacting the wood. The handle of the tool came up and and actually knocked the 3M AS 400 off my head. You asked about coverings to save the shield. Trend makes them for your unit and sometimes you can find universal replacements that will fithttps://www.envirosafetyproducts.com/trend-airshield-pro-clear-visor-overlays.html . They go over the original surface. If I recall someone said they used a plastic cling material like Saran Wrap.
     
  16. Ron Solfest

    Ron Solfest

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    109
    Location (City & State):
    TN
    In 25yrs of turning on and off I’ve launched a few bowls in my shop. Fortunately I’m very good at not standing in the firing line. I’ve had a face shield since I started, but quickly got comfortable enough to only wear it when the outside of a bowl was shooting chips in my face, or when that little voice in my head speaks up. Fortunately that voice did catch my attention a month ago just before a ~1” knot hit my shield , hard.

    For a number of years I’ve been considering an Airstream to protect my lungs, but the price tag kept me from pulling that trigger...and the price has been going up.

    All of that preamble to say that I’ve now solved both problems :)

    At the virtual symposium I saw the PekeSafety mask/air filter products. After extended discussion with the rep, I pulled the trigger. My CleanAir PAPR arrived earlier this week. I spent the day wearing it and turning yesterday. It was comfortable and quiet (I could easily listen to the radio, or talk with my wife when she popped in). Frankly I even forgot I had it on a few times. I ENJOYED it, and it puts a shield over my face and protects my lungs. Now I just need to get the n the habit of wearing it all the time before the “new toy” excitement wears off. The fact I spent $750 should help me get in that habit :)
     
    Bill Boehme and hockenbery like this.

Share This Page