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Cutting blanks from logs with axe or hatchet?

Joined
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I have a feeling the videos that might help will be from a foreign country. There have been a number of them shared on this forum in which the turner used remarkably different methods and tools to produce their results. All of them very adept, as they were professional turners. In any case, try some YouTube searches and I bet you will find some where an axe was the tool used.

Otherwise, my thinker suggests you will need to be very mindful of grain orientation, and always cut 'with the grain' on supported fibers. Staying safe strikes me as markedly harder than if you were prepping a spindle type blank, where it would be macro whittling. Let us know how it comes out.

(BTW, don't forget the Norwegian rule for woodcutting: "If you have 8 hours to cut down a tree, spend 7 hours sharpening your axe.")
 
Joined
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Haha I will remember the Norwegian rule! We have woods around us and much of the chain saw use it clearing up old tree and constantly sharpening the teeth. I’d like to be able as an option to meander in the woods and slice some blanks myself. Also helps not fighting over chainsaw usage:)
 
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The big question is why would you want to?
I suggest that you look up Bodger where they use hand saws to cut cross grain and then use a Fro to split the wood down to turning blanks.
 
Joined
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I think I would buy another chainsaw. A lot less work, and IMO safer vs axe. Its one thing if one wants to use “old manual methods” for the experience/knowledge, quite a different thing to use them as a replacement for a modern tool.
 
Joined
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Haha I will remember the Norwegian rule! We have woods around us and much of the chain saw use it clearing up old tree and constantly sharpening the teeth. I’d like to be able as an option to meander in the woods and slice some blanks myself. Also helps not fighting over chainsaw usage:)
Can I recommend a nice, sharp bow saw, too. Much easier to carry on a meander in the woods than a chain saw.
 
Joined
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If you are going to use an axe, it needs to be sharp enough to shave with. For me, shaving is an unnatural act..... I have a spoon carving friend, his tools are as sharp as scalpels....

robo hippy
 
Joined
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Based on working on non-turning volunteer projects, if you are wanting to cross cut wood while roaming the woods, a 13" Japanese-style pull saw ("Samurai" saw) commonly used by arborists is an excellent tool. They're incredibly sharp out of the box, easy to carry, typically come with a sheath that attaches to your belt so they're easy to carry, and can quickly cut branches up to 4", 6" if you're determined. They're not easy to sharpen as they have long, tightly spaced, triangular teeth, but there's a special triangular stone available to do the job when needed. Silky is probably the most well known brand, but there are many very similar saws. New users have to work at remembering they cut on the pull and not on the push. On the other hand, you can buy 3 bow saws for the price of one of these babies.
iu
 

hockenbery

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a Pole saw- gas, electric, manual is another option.

unless you are exceptionally skilled in using an axe - there will be at least a couple inches of damaged wood on the ends of your harvested wood as well as a considerable pile of chips compared to a saw which cleanly cut the ends while leaving a relatively small ammount of sawdust.
 
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