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Have you broken a Oneway Coring Cutter?

Have you ever broken a Oneway coring cutter?

  • Yes- standard Oneway cutter

    Votes: 1 5.0%
  • Yes- carbide Oneway cutter

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Yes- cutter with additional damage to the system (bent knife, bent support arm, broken cutter screw)

    Votes: 2 10.0%
  • Yes- there was metal embedded in the wood blank

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 17 85.0%

  • Total voters
    20
Joined
May 11, 2022
Messages
64
Likes
69
Location
Salt Lake City, UT
I'm wondering how widespread this is, breaking cutters off while coring. I've now broken a carbide and a regular cutter and this last one boogered up my #1 knife. Its all bent to hell and the cutter screw broke off in the tool which is going to be real fun to deal with. Not coring anything crazy, just english walnut in both situations, about 6 weeks apart.
 
Joined
May 11, 2022
Messages
64
Likes
69
Location
Salt Lake City, UT
I was recently coring with a carbide cutter from AZ Carbide; got a catch and it broke. Ron, at AZ Carbide promptly sent me a new one.
At $30 its almost half the cost of the oneway carbide. Thanks for the tip, I just ordered two. Hopefully I can keep them from breaking.

From the poll its pretty apparent that I am the problem, not the system. Thats not necessarily a surprise, I'm pretty hard on things despite my best efforts.
 
Joined
Jul 9, 2010
Messages
12
Likes
10
Location
Webster, NY
When I first started coring I had some difficulty and made some mistakes. As I remember, the first problem is that I didn't tighten the cap screw enough and it broke. I was able to back the screw out and proceed. The other problem was that I was using a smaller scroll chuck (Oneway Talon) that was too small for the bowl blank. When the blank came out of the chuck, as I remember it bent the blade a bit. I have since started using a larger chuck (Oneway Stronghold) which does a much better job of holding onto the blank.
I have several of the HSS cutters and rotate them. They do need resharpening after each coring, especially if it's mounted on the larger blades. I have borrowed a Oneway carbide cutter and my impression was that it cut much more poorly than my HSS ones.
I'm interested in replacing my cutters with Mike Hunter's Korpro cartridge.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
5,475
Likes
2,830
Location
Eugene, OR
I don't use mine much, mostly because I prefer the McNaughton. Prior to this thread, I have never heard of one breaking. Carbide does tend to be brittle, and if the screw is really tight, and you are pushing way too hard, breaking might happen....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2011
Messages
390
Likes
467
Location
Traverse City, MI
I don't use mine much, mostly because I prefer the McNaughton. Prior to this thread, I have never heard of one breaking. Carbide does tend to be brittle, and if the screw is really tight, and you are pushing way too hard, breaking might happen....

robo hippy

I broke a McNaughton system once... :confused:o_O

(can anybody top that?)
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
5,475
Likes
2,830
Location
Eugene, OR
I have bent all of my blades on the McNaughton. I have not broken the gate, and would consider that impossible. But, nothing is impossible.... I did break the pressure plate on the bottom of my 3520A when coring some black locust. At that time, the A was very new, and they were using a cast iron pressure plate. The replacement was solid steel bar stock. Fortunately, the headstock did not fall off of the lathe, it just tipped forward.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2011
Messages
390
Likes
467
Location
Traverse City, MI
I have bent all of my blades on the McNaughton. I have not broken the gate, and would consider that impossible. But, nothing is impossible.... I did break the pressure plate on the bottom of my 3520A when coring some black locust. At that time, the A was very new, and they were using a cast iron pressure plate. The replacement was solid steel bar stock. Fortunately, the headstock did not fall off of the lathe, it just tipped forward.

robo hippy

I somehow had a catch that bent the blade and broke a pin on the base/turret.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
5,475
Likes
2,830
Location
Eugene, OR
Darryl, I don't think I can top that one. At least not yet.... I do have a madrone and a myrtle log coming next week....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
704
Likes
502
Location
Lummi Island, WA
I somehow had a catch that bent the blade and broke a pin on the base/turret.
Wow! What am I doing wrong? I’ve bent a blade once, get a belt-screeching catch every now and then (I keep the belt a little on the loose side when coring…) but I really didn’t think it was possible to break the turret. I’ve got the older turret version with four strong pins - looks pretty immune from failure.
 
Joined
Jan 3, 2012
Messages
424
Likes
357
Location
New City, NY
when I owned the system, I never broke a cutter. However, a friend of mine bent the cutter arm. I suspect he did not use the support finger appropriately. Folks, If you do not advance the finger meticulously as the depth of the cut increases, you will be putting excessive pressure on the arm and the cutter. Under these conditions, you will increase the risk of breaking/bending the arm or the cutter. I never let the cutter and cutter arm travel more than 1" beyond the supporting finger or if you felt any vibration from the cut, i advanced the finger to give it more support just like you would do with a tool rest. The waste must also be cleared. Not clearing the waste causes a lot of problems. How can you cut wood if you're pushing the dubree into the wood and not the cutter? Also, this was meant to core green wood.
 
Joined
May 11, 2022
Messages
64
Likes
69
Location
Salt Lake City, UT
When I was setting up the arms I had an insert in the morse taper end so I'm sure they were on the center line.

I wondered if the issue was my tenon on the first break. I was using 6" jaws on a vic 120 chuck. The dovetail could have been deeper so I've worked to make that happen since then. I think using the vic multi jaws when really starting messed up my tenon sizing since there isn't much room for depth with those. The tenon on my second break was much deeper and seemed to be at the correct angle for good purchase.

Using the smallest cutter there isn't too much room to insert the cutter arm but I had adjusted it just a few moments before I got my catch.

I haven't gotten back to the coring system yet but did order replacement cutters from AZ carbide that came yesterday. I will stay away from the smallest cores for now since its all bent up anyway.

Like I said, I am hard on tools but I understand that and do try to take it easy. When putting in a new yard in 2019/2020 I went through 6 pick axes. Luckily they were on a lifetime warranty so I only had to pay for the first one and the rest have been free replacements. I stopped grunting, stopped using the head to pry rocks, and despite all that the handles kept breaking.
 
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