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Least Favorite Wood To Sand

Randy Anderson

Beta Tester
Beta Tester
Joined
May 25, 2019
Messages
388
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Location
Eads, TN
Website
candrwoodworks.com
Bradford Pear natural edge once turned is top of my list. As it dries it gets a rust brown layer on it that is very very tough to get through and if you don't get it all it leaves dirty looking spots on very light wood. I've soaked in the LDD bath and made it easier but not really worth it. Twice turned not an issue since dry, sanded and finished right after second turning. I'll do traditional bowls out of it, makes beautiful pieces, but natural edge ones are on my permanent do not turn list. Black cherry can be similar but not as tough and the LDD process is worth the effort usually. Cedar is another I hate to mess with. You can scratch it with your fingernail and it seems every scratch will show if you go for a shine finish.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,531
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1,205
Location
Eugene, OR
Hmm, can't say really. It does seem like the big leaf maple likes to case harden or some thing like that as I sand. Seems like cherry does the same thing, but I seldom get cherry here. I am a fan of the LDD method (liquid dishwashing detergent, 1/2 and 1/2 soap to water, use brown or lemon soap, not green or blue as they will dye the wood, 24 hour soak then rinse). It might be the lanolin in the soap that helps lubricate the wood as you sand, not sure, but it does make sanding less of a pain. A long time ago, I learned to sand at slow speed, both drill and lathe, though to sand my warped bowls, I can't sand at anything more than about 10 to 15 rpm. The abrasives just cut better because they have the time to dig in and cut, which they really can't do if you are sanding at high speeds.

Other than that, I don't like punky wood.... or palm....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Jan 20, 2006
Messages
1,860
Likes
257
Location
virginia
not a fan of sanding in the 2nd place
Norfolk Island pine
 

Emiliano Achaval

Administrator
Staff member
Beta Tester
Joined
Dec 14, 2015
Messages
2,701
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2,380
Location
Maui, Hawaii
Website
hawaiiankoaturner.com
Lignum vitae eats sandpaper like a fat kid eats candy! (but the final result is worth it).
Lignum hardly needs any sanding at all. It is so dense that you can leave a glossy finish. If you start with 320 you can see scratches. One of my favorite woods to turn.
 
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