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November Challenge: Turn a bowl with an Ogee Curve

Emiliano Achaval

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First of all, we apologize for the delay in posting the challenge. This month's challenge is to turn a bowl with an ogee curve. It is open to everyone. No embellishments; let the bowl's shape be its main focus. A quick search with Google will set you in the right direction, if you are wondering what an ogee curve is. Wikipidia says: "An ogee is the name given to objects, elements, and curves—often seen in architecture and building trades—that have been variously described as serpentine-, extended S-, or sigmoid-shaped. Wikipedia" (my grammar corrector was not happy with the Wikipidia grammar, I left it as I found it)
From a woodturning site, I found some nice drawings:
Ogee-Bowl-Design-Rim-Options.jpg

The diameter of the bowl should not exceed 10 inches.
Your choice of finish.
When submitting your photograph, ensure it is a side view so the curve can be appreciated.
@Bill Boehme will be checking this tomorrow. Some changes might occur.

And finally, the fine print from the official AAW Forum legal consultants -- Dewey, Cheatum, and Howe:
  • Only one entry per person and only one photo of your bowl.
  • Entries must be posted in this thread.
  • The deadline for posting entries is midnight Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) on November 27, 2022.
  • As always, this is a turning contest, not a "moldy oldie" photo contest, so in fairness to everybody, make sure your work is something you have made after November 5, 2022.
  • You may not post any photos of your entry in this month’s challenge in any other thread or in the gallery until the voting has ended and a winner has been declared.
  • Voting will take place from November 28, 2022, through midnight UTC on November 30th. 2022
  • Solicitation of votes will result in disqualification.
  • The winner might have to pass a lie detector test before collecting the prizes. :rolleyes: Good luck, have fun, make shavings, and let the chips fall where they may!!
When voting begins, you are allowed two votes, and once you have voted, you won't be able to go back and change your votes. After you have voted, you can track the vote totals. The voting is secret (just like a real election), so nobody else can see who you voted for (not even the moderators/administrators). The voting will end at midnight UTC on November 28th, 2022. In case of a tie vote, the forum moderators will gather in a virtual waist-deep shavings-filled shop to determine the winner.
 
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OK I'll go first I guess. It was a spur of the moment entry, I hadn't actually planned to have an entry since I did not have any dried bowl blanks suitable for it, This ended up being once turned - my original plan for the wood was a 10 inch twice turned bowl from a walnut crotch - but as we all know, best laid plans and all that.... Bark pockets and ring shake combined to make this much smaller 7 inch, and by the time I finished cleaning out the bark pocket I noticed I almost had an ogee shape already. So, I once-turned it to 3/8 wall thickness. Edit: Oh yeah - Finishes out to 6-1/2 inches diameter by 2 inch high.

I got to admit turning an ogee shape INSIDE the bowl to match the outside curve was ten times harder!

Brian_Gustin.jpg

And I know, I know, I DO need to work on my photography, but I only have a relatively old cell phone for a camera and no specific space set up for photos at the moment. (Maybe if I ever decided to sell my bowls and stuff online...)
 
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After negotiations with the Forum Legal Team (Dewey, Cheatum & Howe), I was offered the opportunity (for a fee!) to restate the size of my previous entry (from a bit over 11” to 10”), which would have brought it into compliance with the rules. I considered this for a moment but didn’t want to risk the scandal that would have ensued if I had failed the lie detector test. So I asked them to delete my cherry bowl because my reputation is just too important to me!

This time I’ve more carefully read the rules, so here, then, is my totally legal (I hope!) entry. An 8 1/4” x 3 1/4” Osage Orange bowl.


DA01A704-46A1-4D76-A808-C3C81C3B523E.jpeg
 
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Wanting to participate in this challenge, but lacking a blank cut for that purpose, I chose this Oak round bowl blank. I hoped there was enough ‘room’ to squeeze out an ogee, a form I find difficult to do with grace. It’s subtle, no doubt. The curve really does change direction.

9 inch diameter, white Oak. Rim is sloped inward and curved. Undercut rim. Sanded to 2000 and finished with Walnut oil and wax.

945265D9-9850-473B-B529-F6E7928EABA2.jpeg
 
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Quarter-sawn Australian River Red Gum bowl. Measures 5 1/2" x 2 3/4". Finished with Ack's and Odie's. There is a lot of chatoyance visible in the finished product along with some subtle "lace wing" grain in the bottom. Light in the hand and has a silky feel.

IMGP0149.jpeg
 
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Here is a demo by Jimmy Clewes on turning a platter with an ogee curve. The most important part is his carefully planned procedure for getting a pleasing ogee curve:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SNDxDHShOL8

.
Bill, thanks for sharing this video. Good information. I’ve enjoyed watching him do this in person as well as this video.

Jimmy is showing a ‘regular’, ‘symmetrical’ ogee with a 50/50 use of convex/concave curve, which is a good place to begin. He also, for purposes of repeatability(?) restricts the proportions of the blank. He’s made that same bowl at least a thousand times, so is sure to hit the balance quickly.

But an ogee doesn’t have to be like ogee moulding, regular and symmetrical. It doesn’t need to have big curves. It can be quite subtle, and asymmetric is perfectly fine.

Things important, imo,
Lift it from the table. That lower, convex curve can suffer the effects (visual) of gravity.
That lower curve should continue, one side through the foot to the other side, in a continuous curve that does not crash into the table.
The transition area needs to match,,or balance, be sweeping gracefully between the in and out sections.
The upper, concave curve needs to have the same ‘feel’ as the other. A similar rate of curve and a balance feel.
The rim, whatever design you choose must balance with the piece, in terms of visual weight, thickness.

Most of this can be done with mathematical formula, or a compass for a template. But even then, the transitions, the tiny subtleties can be the difference between the sublime and the ugly.
So, start with a formula, if it’s helpful to or gives you more confidence. Beyond that, you’ll need to look at it. Look hard. Be critical.
Is it sweet, sexy? Or is it just curvy?

These images are from Richard Raffin’s “Turned bowl design” book.
724E39AD-79BC-495A-BF7C-8AA2BC1F09CE.jpegA0A5D895-C229-4F2A-9970-E6C936376A91.jpeg


Also, a nice article.

Marc Banka
 
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