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Joined
Oct 21, 2011
Messages
77
Likes
84
Location
Leicester, UK
Of course! Modern phones have very good cameras. There are quite a few professional photographers that look down their noses at phone cameras but I’ve had pictures from my phone published in magazines and books. Publishers are very fussy about the quality of their pictures!

Richard
 

Michael Anderson

Moderator
Staff member
TOTW Team
Joined
Aug 22, 2022
Messages
1,252
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3,472
Location
Chattanooga, TN
Just like Richard said, yes. There are some limitations, but the gap between phone and dedicated camera system is becoming smaller. I think I remember reading @pat miller say that he uses a phone for his shots, and his photographs are excellent.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2024
Messages
156
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78
Location
Bournemouth, UK
I take more pictures with an iPad than a phone but provided the light is ok they can both produce surprisingly good pictures. I also have a MILC but that’s mainly for holiday pictures.
 
Joined
Jan 22, 2009
Messages
436
Likes
667
Location
Crossville, TN
My photo quality took major steps forward with some advice I received on WoW. I still can’t claim to be a great photographer, but I’m no longer embarrassed by my photos next to others. All my photos are with my iPhone XR, the key for me is a ~graduated light background (gray scale would be better), adequate lighting (still could do much better here), and simple post-processing software (I use Snapseed, free, usually autowhite balance and image tuning wizard are all I use).
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2024
Messages
156
Likes
78
Location
Bournemouth, UK
The only issue I’ve seen using an iPad is when photographing very small pieces. I found the depth of focus was insufficient to do the piece justice. Focus stacking with a MILC solved the problem.
 

Dave Landers

Beta Tester
Joined
Dec 1, 2014
Messages
788
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2,324
Location
Estes Park, CO
Website
dlwoodturning.com
I take more pictures with an iPad than a phone but provided the light is ok they can both produce surprisingly good pictures. I also have a MILC but that’s mainly for holiday pictures.
Curiosity made me google MILC... got stuff about cloud-based herd management, Media Industry Licensing Content, Midstate Independent Living, Milk Income Loss Contract, Minor League Cricket, etc.
Not sure that any of these would help my photography...
 

Michael Anderson

Moderator
Staff member
TOTW Team
Joined
Aug 22, 2022
Messages
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3,472
Location
Chattanooga, TN
Curiosity made me google MILC... got stuff about cloud-based herd management, Media Industry Licensing Content, Midstate Independent Living, Milk Income Loss Contract, Minor League Cricket, etc.
Not sure that any of these would help my photography...
Ha! MILC stands for mirrorless interchangeable lens camera.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2024
Messages
156
Likes
78
Location
Bournemouth, UK
Curiosity made me google MILC... got stuff about cloud-based herd management, Media Industry Licensing Content, Midstate Independent Living, Milk Income Loss Contract, Minor League Cricket, etc.
Not sure that any of these would help my photography...
Sorry Dave, Michael has it. I have a Fuji Mirrorless Camera.
 
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
33
Likes
341
Location
West Linn, Oregon
Website
www.instagram.com
Yes, you can get excellent pictures with a higher end smart phone but ONLY IF you understand lighting (quality and direction). The primary advantages of a DSLR are lens quality, focal length options, and depth of field control. The teeny tiny sensor in smart phones inherently gives tremendous DOF, which in my view is not always an advantage. The "simulated" depth of field (bokeh) adjustments on multi-lens smart phones are OK but not the same as the real thing from a DSLR.
 
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