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Progression

Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
100
Likes
115
Location
Oregon City, Oregon
Up until now the biggest thing that I have turned was around 6x3”, in the last few days I have gotten brave and chainsawed a chunk of cedar tree that was sacrificed to the ice gods. I split a chunk with my chainsaw and had to knock the corners off as they were whacking my banjo, then I followed the procedure in a Lyle Jamison video, and here is my first sizable piece!
Spinning it up to around 700 rpm to rough it out made it go smoothly!

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Joined
Jul 18, 2018
Messages
446
Likes
359
Location
Baltimore, MD
That’s a nice bowl Spike! Every once in a while I misjudge and get something on the lathe that’s just a smidgen too big to clear the banjo or the bed. I’ve used an electric chainsaw, but found a power plane a bit less hair-raising to get the job done.
 
Joined
Sep 5, 2019
Messages
25
Likes
19
Location
Boone, NC
Great progress. Soon you'll be cranking out 14" bowls. Do you have a good four-jaw chuck? That's what I like to use to turn bowls. Keep at it. You'll get more confident with each one.
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
100
Likes
115
Location
Oregon City, Oregon
Great progress. Soon you'll be cranking out 14" bowls. Do you have a good four-jaw chuck? That's what I like to use to turn bowls. Keep at it. You'll get more confident with each one.
Thanks Drew, as a matter of fact I have 2 Nova chucks and use them a lot. In this instance I didn’t want to give up any material to the chuck so I used a Jamison style glue block and it really worked great. I’m thinking that I like the simplicity and security of the glue block on a faceplate.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
163
Likes
75
Location
Quad Cities, IL
Nice job. Congrats. The thrill of my first large bowl is fresh in my mind.
I’ve not used a glue block yet. I did switch to a recess instead of a tenon to save depth and then incorporate it into the bottom design.
How will you finish the bottom?
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,606
Likes
1,268
Location
Eugene, OR
The form on that bowl is perfect, just the right amount of curves in just the right places.

Never understood the concept of a tenon or recess saving depth, unless some one is making a tenon or recess that is 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. It takes surprising little to get a secure hold on a piece of wood. Maybe it is all the practice I have had, but if I go deeper than 1/8 inch, it is a mistake.

I only use glue blocks on lidded boxes.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
100
Likes
115
Location
Oregon City, Oregon
Nice job. Congrats. The thrill of my first large bowl is fresh in my mind.
I’ve not used a glue block yet. I did switch to a recess instead of a tenon to save depth and then incorporate it into the bottom design.
How will you finish the bottom?
Thanks Tom! It was a rush to see it working!
Finishing the bottom is the same as with anything, maybe easier, the glue block is attached with a ring of medium Starbond, and disconnecting it is just tapping on the seam with a chisel. The bowl just pops off with minimal bits to remove.
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
100
Likes
115
Location
Oregon City, Oregon
The form on that bowl is perfect, just the right amount of curves in just the right places.

Never understood the concept of a tenon or recess saving depth, unless some one is making a tenon or recess that is 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. It takes surprising little to get a secure hold on a piece of wood. Maybe it is all the practice I have had, but if I go deeper than 1/8 inch, it is a mistake.

I only use glue blocks on lidded boxes.

robo hippy
Thanks robo! As far as the glue block goes, once I had it made up attaching the bowl to it took no time, and as I was turning the outside between centers I didn’t need to work around the tailstock.
I became leery of a recess with this cedar that had been sitting on the ground since spring, and it lacks the strength to support the rim of the recess unless it is quite deep. (Learned from experience!)
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,606
Likes
1,268
Location
Eugene, OR
I consider the shoulder width to be the more important part of the recess. If your shoulder isn't wide enough, and you over crank it, it can split out just from tightening it. If it is too tight, but doesn't break, then just a tiny catch can cause it to fail. Lots of experience with all situations....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
Messages
713
Likes
439
Location
Lebanon, Missouri
Excellent 1st attempt at a larger bowl! Trimming blanks - I use a template to draw the OD circle then chainsaw (electric or gas, depending) the corners. If I get some edge contact once lathe mounted, a 4” hand grinder with a chainsaw wheel or a carbide insert wheel makes quick work of trimming the blank to clear. Tried many methods and the grinder works best.
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2021
Messages
100
Likes
115
Location
Oregon City, Oregon
Thanks Doug!
As a matter of fact, I did just that with the larger half of the log, it is on the lathe now, partially roughed!
The smaller half was trimmed on the bandsaw, and needed some trimming to clear the blade guides.
 
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