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Reliant Dust Collector?

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does anyone know much about Reliant dust collectors. I have the oppertunity to buy a used 820 model for $150 delivered. I am not able to find the brand or model specs online anywhere. It has a 2hp motor, dual 4" outlets, 30' of hose, and i thinks 1500 cfm (based on motor hp) I just went and looked at it and it is in really good shape. Any ideas on the brand and asking price?

PSI has what i think may be a similar model for $295.

Please help trying to get it tonight if possible.

Add:
I looked into the intake and the impeller looks undamaged.
 
Last edited:
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It's more than about the money

That's a good article, but dust collectors aren't supposed to be dust filters, and you pay for size and horsepower. I've never heard of Reliant either, but from what you say, it sounds like you've a good deal. Were you able to see & hear it running? That'd be my only other precaution.

I've one the same size and added a metal trash can with the PSI plastic lid to make it a two stage. You can also get felt bags from them, but still need a dust filter to work in an enclosed space. A dust collector will pick up shavings, curls, most sanding dust, etc., but finer stuff will end up going through the bags and float about until settling all over everything. A good dust filter will suck up most of that, but there can still be really fine sanding dust even then. If you don't go past about 400 grit, most of it will be large enough to be filtered out.
 
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I has one

cypher said:
does anyone know much about Reliant dust collectors. I have the oppertunity to buy a used 820 model for $150 delivered. I am not able to find the brand or model specs online anywhere. It has a 2hp motor, dual 4" outlets, 30' of hose, and i thinks 1500 cfm (based on motor hp) I just went and looked at it and it is in really good shape. Any ideas on the brand and asking price?

PSI has what i think may be a similar model for $295.

Please help trying to get it tonight if possible.

Add:
I looked into the intake and the impeller looks undamaged.

Cypher
"Reliant" was Woodworkers Warehouse house brand of Taiwanese generic stuff. Company is "BK". I've had the 2hp (real) 720 for almost 10 years. It's set up in my garage and pulls from the basement shop; cancel's both noise and dust leakage issues that way. First, it's nowhere near a real 1,500 CFM machine. The 11" steel impeller in this unit will not pull more than 1,000 through a 6" main on it's best day, but it is a servicable collector. Does have a nasty habit of the impeller getting loose on the motor shaft. When it does, you'll hear it, but the fix is easy without taking the whole inlet plate off the machine.

No more than $150, though; new it was $300 plus shipping/tax.

mm
 
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Hopefully it's better then my Reliant BS.

It is probably a similar model to PSI or HF's current runs, or AMT's old ones
 
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n7bsn said:
Hopefully it's better then my Reliant BS.

It is probably a similar model to PSI or HF's current runs, or AMT's old ones

I will start a separate thread if need be, What are your issues with the reliant BS. Both my father and I have them. 14 in models. My father has put considerable money into his for a Krieg Resaw fence and a riser block kit. Dad had considerable problems with the riser block issue.

Dad bought his when the Woodworkers warehouse had a sale. 6 months later they had an even better sale and he asked me if I need a BS for $150. Couldn't pass it up for that price and Dad was delivering it from PA to VA(6 hour drive).

I have found mine to be invaluable but have been pretty amature with it.
No problems at all with mine. Concerned by what Dad has gone thru though!
 
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Reliant BS

SUBDOC said:
I will start a separate thread if need be, What are your issues with the reliant BS. ...!

I have the 14 inch with the riser. I find that it bogs down way to easy roughing bowls and that I have never been able to get the tension right so that I could resaw (and cut a straight line)

I replaced the guideblocks with cool block and rollers, that did help. But the issue is still a lack of power
 
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The standard joke at this end of the world (and mine had it written on by the original owner) is to call them UN-Reliants. That being said, they last forever and are actually fine for the hobby woodworker.

The thing to know about Reliant is that it's a Tiawanese knockoff designed to sell at very low prices. Everything about it is solid but tollerances are pretty loose and quality is very consistantly mediocre. Every once in a while, you get a machine that just happened to come together perfectly in all of it's small defects, but that is the exception. Basically, good for a home shop and work that doesn't need alot of precision. Not proffessional woodworker quality (usually).

An example would be my reliant BS. The hole in the casting for my blade guide bar is approx 2degrees off vertical, causing me to have to adjust the placement of my guides every time I change the height. The drive wheel (bottom) is also just off horizontal, resulting in the blade riding to the front of the wheel. Can't be adjusted. Also, because of this, when I set the top wheel so that the blade rides the center of the boot, the wheel touches the metal casing intermittantly, causing an awful racket. Finally, the tension spring is so weak that the saw won't run more than a 1/4 inch blade.

Solutions: I set the guide at top height and it stays there. New tension spring. 2hp aftermarket used motor (free). Riser. Home built milling table. Bent the top casing so that it doesn't touch. Bits and pieces of aftermarket improvements. Also, I have to break it apart about once a year and do touch up work on motor, bearings, guides, etc.

Total cost: $175. Result, excellent milling saw that is never used for fine work. All in all, a very good value.

So that's what your looking at for the dust collector. It will likely be loud, less powerful than you think, need some aftermarket improvements/modifications (bigger ports, nicer ducts, felt bag, etc) and require regular maintanence. That said, $150 is an excellent price for a home shop dust collector and I'd buy it in a second if it was near me.

Dietrich
 
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Thanks for all the input. After looking at the link provided by Jack Savona I decide to go ahead and buy it. I was never looking for this to act as a dust filter as I understand 1-stage collectors will not provide this. I have a hanging air filter coming for that. The collector was delivered to me last night. It works great. I took the impeller cover off to exam it more closely and it does not have any dings in the impeller or casing. I hope that this indicates that nothing large and hard was ever sucked through it. I think I will add the trashcan pre catch like Waltben did and make it a 2-stage since there is no catch screen before the impeller. I would hate to suck up a rag or something large. I will definitely consider converting it to felt bags or filter top to help the dust issue.

Now I just have to figure out where to put it and how to pipe my shop. I like Mark Mandell's idea of putting it in a separate area. I have a covered patio that shares a wall with my shop. Maybe I can put it out there to reduce noise and dust in the shop.

This may be a stupid question:
The NN-820 collector can be run on 110 or 220. It is currently wired 110. Will the run better on 220?

A little comedy:
anyone want to park this outside their shop - Dust Collector
or better yet how about this one - Collector
 
Last edited:
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Yes & No

cypher said:
It is currently wired 110. Will the run better on 220?

It will make no difference to performace if you run it one way or t'other. Having said that, it will make a difference in the amperage used (220 is half of 110) which can make a difference in how many other things you can have running off your house service panel at the same time. If you don't mind the lights dimming and the video shrinking every tiime you turn on the DC, you'll be fine; Just don't run the beastie on a circuit that has other stuff running as well. Conversely, always having the full amp draw available by way of a 220 circuit, especially during the start phase, will help your machine (and the lights and TV) work better. I run mine on 220.

mm

ps. "congrats" on the New Baby
 
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Mark Mandell said:
It will make no difference to performace if you run it one way or t'other. Having said that, it will make a difference in the amperage used (220 is half of 110) which can make a difference in how many other things you can have running off your house service panel at the same time. If you don't mind the lights dimming and the video shrinking every tiime you turn on the DC, you'll be fine; Just don't run the beastie on a circuit that has other stuff running as well. Conversely, always having the full amp draw available by way of a 220 circuit, especially during the start phase, will help your machine (and the lights and TV) work better. I run mine on 220.

mm

ps. "congrats" on the New Baby

Thanks for the tips and the congrats. I got to get all the turning in before the new one comes in Oct.
 
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A note of caution

http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm is a web site that was created by someone to selling services and products. There are some facts there, but the're surrounded by much inuendo and major hype. It's kind of like watching a string of infomercials. Bill will definitely design and provide you an excellent system, but it won't be for free.
 
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Longer the run, greater the vacuum loss. Make your connections tight and your options few, and that means blast gates in the "closed" position as well, and you may get away with a medium unit in a remote location.

Don't expect it to haul trash. You'll want a lot of suction and gravity as well to have even a chance at anything bigger than sanding dust. Make one of those rim-to-button cuts on the inside of a bowl, and when the excelsior departs, your 4" hose will clog anyway. I have hardware cloth over the opening of my ducts to limit accidental clogging from drops in the shavings when I'm resetting.

As to the ceiling units, they're not going to work well against gravity either, save on the smallest particles. Between the source and the collector is what you're trying to protect - you. Not my choice. Get as much air as possible moving away from the point of dust generation. What you do with it once it's clear is another matter.

Almost forgot. The less distance you haul the heavy stuff the better. Puts the cyclone or substitute inside the shop. The rest can go outside and follow the noise.
 
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