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Repairing epoxy

Joined
Jan 19, 2009
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I did a pour and was very happy with the results until I put sanding scratches on it. Not sure how to repair it without finishing the entire pour area. Have not read anything on repairs.
Thank you
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Joined
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Epoxy , much like plastic, needs a lengthy grit progression from the initial grit causing the scratches all the way to 3000 grit or higher - maybe after 600 grit one of those auto headlight lens "repair" kits which is pretty much just a very fine buffing compound.. That or you can do a thinned epoxy re-coat (such as bar-top epoxy) I believe.. but kinda hard to do that evenly on a round object. - Another reason I don't bother with epoxy turnings. too much sanding and polishing involved to get a clear scratch-free finish.
 
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Peter,
As we say in Redneck Land, you gotcha one. From the pics, I'd guess you're turning mesquite. Please send a couple of pics of the whole piece with some sort of size reference in the pic
 

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Joined
Jan 19, 2009
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Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Peter,
As we say in Redneck Land, you gotcha one. From the pics, I'd guess you're turning mesquite. Please send a couple of pics of the whole piece with some sort of size reference in the pic
John, It is a mesquite cookie that is 23 x 21 x1.5" The epoxy area is 8" wide by 2.75 at the widest point
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Never done a platter. The advantage of a hollow-form is that the "form" stays in-tact in-spite of the large voids.
I use lots of black epoxy but it is always "turned" and then sanded to 320 prior to finishing.
 
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Anytime I use epoxy I sand to 12,000 to make sure there are no scratches. I have some sanding foam pads that go from 1,000 to 12,000. I wet sand when I get to that point.
 
Joined
Dec 18, 2020
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If you use epoxy as a finish coat it will fill all the sanding scratches - I only sand resin bowls to 180 and only pay attention top the wood surface knowing the epoxy is going to smotth out when finished...
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Joined
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Erik - Do you "rub-out" after the last coat? What is the diameter of the piece? Your work is definitely unique - having a bit of difficulty wrapping my mind around it. My experience is that buyers need the "what is it" factor answered before they purchase. Then again, maybe the "enigma" factor creates more value - that can only be answered after a few beers. Of course I'm "assuming" that creating something of value was the goal - or maybe you were just messing around and that's what popped out. Either way, congrats: it's a great looking piece.
 
Joined
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Erik - Do you "rub-out" after the last coat? What is the diameter of the piece? Your work is definitely unique - having a bit of difficulty wrapping my mind around it. My experience is that buyers need the "what is it" factor answered before they purchase. Then again, maybe the "enigma" factor creates more value - that can only be answered after a few beers. Of course I'm "assuming" that creating something of value was the goal - or maybe you were just messing around and that's what popped out. Either way, congrats: it's a great looking piece.
John -
I have found that the epoxy 'high gloss shine' will fade with handling so I use the Beal buffing system to polish & wax the resin after it has cured for a few weeks

most of my resin bowls are ~ 10" in diameter and about 5" - 6" tall as they all come from the same mold - after trying a bunch of different things to use as a form for casting resin I found that my local Walmart sells a plastic 6 qt. salad bowl (made in the US no less) for a few bucks - when I see them in the store I usually grab a couple - they usually last for a few casts before they crack or I blow them up when using compressed air to pop them out of the mold...

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on the right is a resin blank fresh out of the mold and you can see the remnants of the blown up plastic bowl behind it - oops. On the left are 2 "scrap resin molds' one almost filled so I was making a new one... as resin is expensive and to make sure you have enough to cast whatever you are working on you almost always have extra left over - rather than tossing it we always have a scrap resin mold on hand - when it fills up I turn it and start another - the result is a random mix of resin colors from all the projects worked on for the weeks/months it took to fill it up... these random color mixes are often more popular than the single color of resin in a deliberate casting.

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here are a few currently sitting in the bay window in my kitchen. I have been making bowls like this for a few years and people;e seem to like them - they make up about 20% of my inventory but when I give someone a bowl and let them pick whatever they want - resin bowls like these are selected more than half the time.

once you have made enough stuff on the lathe to fill your house you have to find a place for the excess - as soon as you get to that point you have to make not just what you like but what others are willing to take off your hands so that why I make as many of these as I do
 
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I was in a gallery here in Dallas from 2007 to Covid - their specialty was art glass (bowls, wall groups). They were in the Design District - while lots of individuals came through, the principal customer was the designer or interior architect, commercial and home.
My dollar to your donut says there are a few glass galleries in your area - designers are always looking for different/unique. Your stuff would play well.
 
Joined
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Peter - glad I could encourage you to take another pass at the resin - I have found that resin can add a lot of color and interest to a piece while filling voids or fixing cracks and has let me use wood to make something functional that was destined for the firewood pile... resin skills have also spilled over into my flat work - boards that I used to reject due to a crack/knot/void that otherwise had really great figure I now use without thinking
 
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Erik, this is the finished item. The epoxy is 1.5" thick and clear. I painted the bottom black and added some color for depth. Thanks again for your advice.
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