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Any South Sound WA hollowing masters? Need help.

Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
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Location
Steilacoom, WA
Hi there, looking for a hand with hollowing. I bought a Crown Revolution setup to dip my toes in it, but that rig isn’t exactly user friendly, or I just have very poor technique. Super grabby, loves to twist, and generally just takes forever.

if anyone somewhat local to the Tacoma, Olympia, etc. area has a hollowing system they’re happy with, I would love to take a look at it and try it out.

not local? I’ll take recommendations all day.
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2020
Messages
115
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160
Location
Jackson, NJ
Website
www.blacklabelwoodworks.com
How big and deep are you trying to hollow? That system looks like a headache to me for anything over 4 or 5 inches deep. Any system that uses a mechanical connection to the lathe to control the torque would work better. I personally built a capture ring system that does not rely on my second hand to keep the tool from twisting so i can put both hands on the tool.
 
Joined
Jan 17, 2020
Messages
24
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4
Location
Steilacoom, WA
Well, I’m really just starting to try and figure it out. Right now I’ve got a chunk on the lathe that would end up hollowing out about 7-8” across by 6” or so deep? I’ve handled a vase that was about 4” wide and 8” deep, but it was really dry and crumbly spalted stuff.
 

Emiliano Achaval

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Dec 14, 2015
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Location
Maui, Hawaii
Website
hawaiiankoaturner.com
I have tried several systems. The one that I would consider the most user-friendly, with the best customer support is the Lyle Jamieson system. I use the big 1 1/4in I have been making urns as deep as 17 inches. The Trent Bosch is also a good option. Tried it with the 3/4 in and was ok.
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
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Location
Lebanon, Missouri
Looking at vids of that system, 1) handle is too short, 2) easy to set the articulating tip far off center creating a lot of torque, 3) hard to tell details of hooded cutter, appears easy to set for too large of a cut.

For hand held hollowing I use 25” handles, and only go ~5” deep. Its is very important to set the cutting edge just above CL and keep the handle level - to help me do this I stick a small bubble level on the tool. Ellsworth uses offcenter bent tools, and if you keep the edge above center it will swing away from the cut when too heavy, get it below center and it digs in or catches. I prefer the cutting edge on tool CL so it doesnt torque much.

I mainly use hand held for starting a hollow vessel ( I do drill a hole to start) since chips must be removed often. After creating room I use a captured system, Lyle Jamieson’s. Handheld hollowing requires constant concentration and the constant threat of physical injury, which took all the fun out of it. I may still ruin a piece with a system, but I wont hurt myself.

Most experienced hollowers use either 3/16” hss or 6mm cupped carbide cutters (Hunter #1). Small cutting edges limit the cutting force, needed as the edge gets farther from support. I use 8.9 mm flat round carbide for my shop made hand held. The larger hooded cutters can grab too big of a cut. Suggest you experiment with open forms (or just a platter shape) and different settings of the hood as well as cutter position to gain experience with the tool. Simulate depth by moving the tool rest back. Take a look at tools from Trent Bosch, John Jordan, David Ellsworth, Lyle Jamieson, Advanced Lathe tools, as well as the articulating type. You will get an idea of the design concepts.

I wanted a system to do ~ 4” to ~15” deep up to ~14” dia. My choice was Lyle’s, after considering total cost and capability. I’ve been very pleased with it. I’ve also put a camera system together, cheaply, vs using a laser. Camera mounts in the laser holder.

Your existing bars will probably fit into most systems.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
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1,268
Location
Eugene, OR
Well, D Way makes a hollowing system and they are in the neighborhood. I haven't tried theirs, and I don't do many hollow forms. The farther you hang out off of the tool rest, the smaller your cutter needs to be, and the bigger your tool shaft diameter needs to be.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
408
Likes
175
Location
Lummi Island, WA
The Fife club - South Puget Sound Woodturners - is right in your neighborhood - I no longer live in the area, but there were several members that were very expert at hollowing - one even sold a pretty well-respected hollowing tool of his own design. Check the AAW website for contact info. They were a large club and growing when I left the area 6 years ago, and really into providing mentoring.

Website https://spswoodturners.org/
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
408
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175
Location
Lummi Island, WA
As Emilio and Doug above said - a captured system works really well and allows you to hollow safely with ease. I, too use the Lyle Jamieson system - a home-built version. (Lyle used to have full dimensions on his website for those comfortable with building rather than buying, but a quick look didn't find them earlier today.) If you're handy with a welder, or know someone who is that owes you a favor, it's a pretty simple build. Lyle sells the bars and cutters including Hunter carbide cutters for it at reasonable prices.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
405
Likes
369
Location
Shingletown CA
Hi there, looking for a hand with hollowing. I bought a Crown Revolution setup to dip my toes in it, but that rig isn’t exactly user friendly, or I just have very poor technique. Super grabby, loves to twist, and generally just takes forever.

if anyone somewhat local to the Tacoma, Olympia, etc. area has a hollowing system they’re happy with, I would love to take a look at it and try it out.

not local? I’ll take recommendations all day.
The one you got from me is really only good for solid hardwoods. Softwoods like punky big leaf maple, are almost impossible with anything but a small open cutter (bosch) or something simular. The carbide cutters don't work very well on softer woods either.
 
Joined
Apr 11, 2014
Messages
288
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261
Location
Dallas, TX
A guy I taught hollowing opted away from my internal rest and went with the large Trent Bosch - from what I've seen, it's well made and, no doubt, a better choice for smaller (<14" diameter) with smaller holes (<2"). The cutter is also a major consideration - lot's of guys use the 3/16" cobalt cutter which, in the right hands, does the job. I've used the Rolle Munro for over 15-years and, while it has its own learning-curve, works well in the large hollow-forms I do.
Whichever method you go with, stick with one and get good at it. And get ready to spend a few bucks on the good stuff - the "shovel in the cement mixer" is not a proverb.
 
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