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Buffing

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I'm reading a lot about vonex as a buffing compound. I've been using the Beall system - tripoli, white diamond and carnauba wax pretty much. I do skip the white diamond on walnut because the white gets into the pores. On pens I've used GluBoost, micromesh and Novus three step polish followed by buffing with Ren. Wax.

I know vonex is used after Parfix. Can anyone speak about their experience with vonex and it's use?
 
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john lucas

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Have not heard of Vonex. I have noticed that Tripoli takes a long time to buff out defects in parrafix finishes. I wonder if vonex I'd courser.
 
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I believe it is spelled "Vonax". Vonax is a substitute for white diamond, and I use it in the same manner: after tripoli and before wax. Its biggest advantage is not leaving the white residue in pores. I have used it on walnut oil, oil base poly, and lacquer finishes. When I use Osmo Polyx as a finish, I skip the tripoli and go straight to Vonax. I like it. I will continue to use my white diamond until it is used up (when there is no danger of leaving a white residue) but will probably just use Vonax if I am still alive when I run out of white diamond
 
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Look up Mark Silay on utube. There are several videos where he discusses his finish prep, parfix, and Vonax use. From what I can tell Mark seems to have started parfix 3408 and vonax use in the US.
 
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I'm reading a lot about vonex as a buffing compound. I've been using the Beall system - tripoli, white diamond and carnauba wax pretty much. I do skip the white diamond on walnut because the white gets into the pores. On pens I've used GluBoost, micromesh and Novus three step polish followed by buffing with Ren. Wax.

I know vonex is used after Parfix. Can anyone speak about their experience with vonex and it's use?
Does the Tripoli not get in the pores? Hmmm, I dunno. I've heard of skipping the Tripoli, but not the White Diamond. You might be loading too much WD compound on the wheel. Also, perhaps consider wet sanding with a oil/varnish mix to fill the pores, wipe and let cure, and that would fill the pores. There's a technique to that, and it takes some time. Just a thought.
 
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Does the Tripoli not get in the pores? Hmmm, I dunno. I've heard of skipping the Tripoli, but not the White Diamond. You might be loading too much WD compound on the wheel. Also, perhaps consider wet sanding with a oil/varnish mix to fill the pores, wipe and let cure, and that would fill the pores. There's a technique to that, and it takes some time. Just a thought.
Hmm, I just yesterday got Tripoli stuck in some spots on an expensive Claro Walnut bowl. That was my first step after three coats of Waterlox. Anyway to get it out?
 
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Hmm, I just yesterday got Tripoli stuck in some spots on an expensive Claro Walnut bowl. That was my first step after three coats of Waterlox. Anyway to get it out?
I'll leave it someone else to answer that question, but I really get the feeling you're overloading the wheels. Perhaps post a photo? It's hard to tell visually how much is on the WD or wax wheels, but the Tripoli wheel should be a light rouge color. If there's too much on the wheel, firmly wrap some 60-grit sandpaper around a flat piece of stock and run it over the wheel until it's clean. Might be a good idea, also, to watch Beall's video(s) on how to use the buffing system.

[I still am wondering about filling the pores before finishing -- anyone else have an opinion?]
 
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john lucas

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If your getting white residue in your walnut your shells have too much wax on them. Early on I had lots of problems with this. I cleaned my wheels using the sharp edge of a freshly cut board. My white wheel looks like it doesnt even have anything on it. I apply a quick swipe of the white diamond and buff. I do sand to 600 grit which might also help. I turn a fair amount of walnut and dont have a problem with white residue. Occasionally I do get carry over into textured details but even that is rare.
 
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Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
You might be loading too much WD compound on the wheel.


Jamie has the answer! :)

When I first started using the Beall 3-step buff system, I loaded up the wheels too much. Now I don't have these problems, and my buffed bowls are showing it.

Use the EEE and WD very sparingly, and your success in using these products will benefit markedly......without losing any of the benefits that they are capable of.

-----odie-----
 
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Like most things, the longer you stick with the program, the better you get with it.

We have so many alternatives in woodturning, that many people try things once or twice, and then decide it doesn't work as they've been told it would. They move on to other methods without knowing what "time in the saddle" can benefit them.

Believe it, or not.....there is a certain "skill" that can be developed when using the Beall system.....and, it doesn't come overnight! o_O

-----odie-----
 
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Like most things, the longer you stick with the program, the better you get with it.

We have so many alternatives in woodturning, that many people try things once or twice, and then decide it doesn't work as they've been told it would. They move on to other methods without knowing what "time in the saddle" can benefit them.

Believe it, or not.....there is a certain "skill" that can be developed when using the Beall system.....and, it doesn't come overnight! o_O

-----odie-----
You're not kidding there is a "skill"!
 
Joined
Jul 24, 2008
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Location
Montfort, Wisconsin
Does the Tripoli not get in the pores? Hmmm, I dunno. I've heard of skipping the Tripoli, but not the White Diamond. You might be loading too much WD compound on the wheel. Also, perhaps consider wet sanding with a oil/varnish mix to fill the pores, wipe and let cure, and that would fill the pores. There's a technique to that, and it takes some time. Just a thought.
Jamie, I suspect the white diamond shows up more because it's white. I don't always wet sand but when I do the specks are not an issue. It's just easiest for me to skip white diamond on non-wet sanded wood. I barely touch the wheel and sometimes don't even add any so I don't think I'm overloading it.
 
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I rarely see white residue embedded into pores. I usually buff on top of film finishes like oil base poly so residue would not be expected, even in walnut. I have seen white residue most often in bark layers but even then, not very often. When I buff an unsealed surface, like wood treated with walnut oil, I usually don't see a white residue, but on darker woods, I usually go directly to Vonax because "why take a chance?"
 
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