• Gallery Images: Title and Description Required

    Please read the new sticky announcement HERE for full details.

  • Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Questions about Bowl Coring for PM 2014

Joined
Jan 13, 2021
Messages
74
Likes
26
Location
San Antonio, TX
I have a few questions about bowl coring with my new powermatic 2014. It has a 1 HP 3 phase motor. It has a bed extension that will allow a 19 inch swing. I have recently purchased a Trent Bosch Hollowing Stabilizer. The TB system has both 3/4 bars and 1/2 inch bars and handles. It has a "gate" with 2 pins and 4 positions.

My questions are:
  • Can this motor handle coring
  • Would it be possible to use the McNaughton bars/cutters for coring with the TB Stabilizer? Can I swap out the bars I have with just the McNaughton bars?
I also have the laser indicator for the T.B. system so I can imagine that working really well to core out bowl blanks.
Has anyone else tried this?

Please let me know if you have or your thoughts on alternatives if this is not a good idea.
Thanks
Al in Texas
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 13, 2021
Messages
74
Likes
26
Location
San Antonio, TX
I've taken a closer look at the McNaughton bars. I'm not sure if they would work with TB system. I'm not sure if the ends of the bars are rods (3/4 or 1/2) and the length of the rod part of the bar. Can anyone tell me those specs?
Al
 
Joined
Jun 13, 2020
Messages
82
Likes
122
Location
Jackson, NJ
Website
www.blacklabelwoodworks.com
You would need to use the turret for the mcnaughton the bars are not rods they are flat bars with a wider cutting tip at the end. When i core i slide the headstock all the way to the end of the bed with the banjo for the tool rest inches from the end of the ways. It takes up no more space then hollowing out the inside of a bowl.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,331
Likes
1,027
Location
Eugene, OR
Well, 1 hp is a bit under powered for the McNaughton, though it can be done by some one who has a lot of experience with the tool. I would suggest getting the Woodcut system. Pretty simple, It used to only have 2 blades, but now they have a 3 blade set up. You wouldn't need the third blade, but having it just in case or when you want to step up, you have it. I do have a video about using the McNaughton.

McNaughton did make a laser set up for the coring system. It is supposed to mount through the set screws that secure the blade. I had it welded to my handle. I am not familiar with the TB system, but most things can be adapted if you are creative....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
Messages
530
Likes
280
Location
Lebanon, Missouri
I don't think the Woodcut system would work without the TS to support it, ie working off the end of the lathe for a larger bowl. It would work fine up to the 14" swing between centers, If you decide to try it, get the 3 blade version. It will allow more options for the shape of cored bowls, mainly a bit flatter profile.

I believe the Oneway coring system can work mounted on the "outboard" extension, it does not use the TS. I haven't used a McNaughton, but I think the reason it takes more power than Woodcut or Oneway is due to the flexibility of blade path, ie you can start to bind the blade, whereas the other 2 fairly precisely control blade path.
 
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
372
Likes
134
Location
Lummi Island, WA
I learned to use the MacNaughton on my older Jet 1642 - the one horse version. Its very possible. Just take your time (not that you'll have a choice with 1 hp). I kept the speed at about 600 - 750 and the feed reasonably slow if you can, particularly when it makes the turn to the bottom and has a tendency to self feed. Like anything else, sharp tools are a must - I honed before every cut.
When I replaced the jet with a 3hp AB the lessons learned came in handy. I still keep the speed about the same but the feed rate is less critical...
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,331
Likes
1,027
Location
Eugene, OR
Oops, forgot that it needs the tailstock support, and didn't know the PM didn't have one. Not familiar with that lathe.

No clue as to how fast I turn when coring. Never had a read out. I would guess I go up into the 700+ range.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2021
Messages
74
Likes
26
Location
San Antonio, TX
Thanks for all the feedback everyone. It really does help me in my decision making process.
It looks like the McNaughton may not work for my PowerMatic 2014.
The PowerMatic 2014 does have a bed extension and it can be used in 2 positions. One adds 13 inches (33") to the length of the bed rest at 14" swing. The second lower position allows for a 19" swing but not at 33" center to center.

pm2014.jpg
pm2014ext.jpg

So it appears that the Oneway system or maybe the Woodcut system would work but not with the larger cutters.
I am going to keep exploring options. The Woodcut system might work on larger bowls but would be limited to very shallow bowls (I think).
Thanks again for all the feedback.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2009
Messages
80
Likes
22
Comparing the PM 2014 to the PM 3520B or C, the useful torque loss is not 50% because of the higher ratio (motor speed to spindle sped) of the 2014 in Low spindle speed range. The loss would be more likely in the 35% range. Granted that torque is a static value and does no work, the horsepower loss is still 50%. Strictly speaking In a given amount of time you will be able to do 1/2 the work. My point is that since the torque loss is less than 50% it will be easier start and maintain the cut than what you might expect from the 50% loss in HP, but expect 1/2 the volume of chips in a unit of time.
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2021
Messages
74
Likes
26
Location
San Antonio, TX
Thanks everyone.
I am leaning towards a Oneway system because of the Woodcut system's need for use of the tailstock.
Robo Hippy, the PM 2014 has electronic variable speed ranges that include 15-900 rpm, 30-1800 rpm, and 60-3600 rpm.
Thanks for all the input!
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2017
Messages
126
Likes
45
Location
Roscoe, Illinois
Prior to upgrading to a new lathe recently I owned the Nova Comet II which had a 3/4 HP motor. I did some hollowing with it and found that, as long as I was patient, and just took smaller cuts each time it worked well with sharp tools. I didn’t do any large vessels but, for the smaller ones, it worked. My only point is that the PM2014’s motor is likely generates significantly more power than the Comet. However, taking the long view, if you want something that will allow you to expand your projects for the future, I’d go with something larger. That was the conclusion I finally reached after considering the 2014 and then ending up with the 3520C.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
3,331
Likes
1,027
Location
Eugene, OR
I do prefer the 3 speed ranges. Have it on my Robust AB, which is one of the first ones, and on my Vic 240. That mid range has enough speed for medium to large bowls and for coring as well. Low range isn't fast enough for smaller bowls. Not sure if your lathe needs to be on low or medium. One way to find out....

robo hippy
 
Top