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Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

odie

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Another great idea Odie.

Hey, do you ever misplace any of these jigs in your shop?? I find that all my "timesavers" need to be organized or they end up costing me more time looking for them:mad:!

my rule of thumb: I don't allow myself any horizontal spaces closer than the area to properly store the tool / jig. ... but still I will find forsner bit caps on the drill press and drill bits on my stool after a weekend of work:eek:.

Tom

Thanks, Tom......

I wish I could say I never misplace anything, but it's seldom!

Thanks to my Dad (RIP), I'm a very organized shop keeper. He was a little over zealous in keeping a everything organized and spic'n'span, but he did teach me the value of having a place for everything, and everything in it's place. It's not that difficult to initially become organized, but it must be followed up by putting things away when you're done, each and every time.......that's the trick!

In these two pics, you can see that I've hung the "minimum diameter jig" on a nail close by to the lathe. Easy to get at whenever it's used. That's the idea behind putting a little loop of rope on many things.......to hang on a nail, or hook.

Later, friend.......:)

ooc
 

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odie

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Cut off cotton glove

Here is a cut off cotton glove that I've been using to make hand contact with the tool rest slide easily, and with less friction. The cotton glove slides along the tool rest very well. When cutting off the fingers, be sure to leave your index finger longer than the others, so it will work with any grip you're using at the moment. It works just as well for overhand, as it does for underhand.

This may not work well for newbies who are still using the "death grip"! :(

For those of you who are turning with confidence, and using a light touch for tool control......it works tremendously well. :D

The glove can be used right, or left handed, depending on the needs of the moment.

ooc
 

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odie

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While I'm on the subject of making your tool slide effortlessly on the tool rest, this additional thread from January is appropriate to add here. The glove works well, but there are other things that can be done to make your tool slide even better......used in conjunction with each other, these are things that will improve your turning ability.

Here's the other thread:

click:

http://www.aawforum.org/vbforum/showthread.php?t=9932

(Sorry, this link is no longer any good......lost when the new forum was initiated.)

ooc
 

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My useful gadget is a jam-chuck with a cord grip tip to finish the bottoms of hollow forms. The length of the spindle is adjusted so the cord grip puts pressure on the bottom of the hollow form. There is a step in the spindle where the cord grip sits.
 

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odie

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My useful gadget is a jam-chuck with a cord grip tip to finish the bottoms of hollow forms. The length of the spindle is adjusted so the cord grip puts pressure on the bottom of the hollow form. There is a step in the spindle where the cord grip sits.

Thanks James.......nice to see a little creative shop from others! :cool2:


If anyone isn't using a rubber belt cleaning stick, you ought to give it a try. They work wonders cleaning crud from abrasive belts and discs. They also make abrasives last longer.......a very good thing!

When the rubber stick gets too short to handle, it's very easy to get every last bit of use out of one, by epoxying a handle on it. This one is an old hall closet curtain rod that broke, and was replaced. Never throw things like this away, cause you never know when it'll come in handy! :D

A bit of old dowel like this can be used over and over again for this purpose!

ooc
 

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odie

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This probably won't be of any help to very many other turners, but for those of you who would rather use a (very old-school) faceplate and waste block, it might.....:)

For roughing and any remounts during the seasoning process, I'm using a chuck.......pretty much standard procedure for most turners these days. Except for final finishing of the foot with jumbo jaws, I don't use a chuck after the seasoning process is completed. Because of this, I need some way to mate a roughed bowl to the foot.....squared and true. This allows for proper positioning of the waste block, and is done using the chuck and cutting a surface on the rim to mate to the grippers of the jumbo jaws. After completing that, I can then mount the seasoned bowl to the jumbo jaws and prepare a flat surface on the tenon. It also allows for finding an exact center of the foot, after the waste block is attached........a necessity for use with screw center chucks. This prepared flat surface will run true to the surface previously cut for mounting to the jumbo jaws.

In order to do this with precision, I need to make a perfect fit of the turned surface to the grippers of the jumbo jaws. It would be a hassle to try and see how that surface mates to the grippers by using the jumbo jaws themselves, or to hold the gripper by itself in my hand.

I have mounted one gripper to a board, which allows me to check this mating of surfaces quickly and easily. You'll see a "half moon" cut-out near the gripper......this makes for a better visual check.

ooc
 

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odie

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Here are three pieces of white-backed shelving that I use to view the profile shape of mounted bowls. This comes in handy to clearly see imperfections in the shape. I use these on nearly every bowl I make, because it's important to get a good look at the profile, and deal with imperfections in the shape while it's still easy to correct. There probably isn't any turner who hasn't wished he could go back and do a correction to a shape, when it's too late! :mad:

There are two simple pieces that are placed on the bedways, or banjo to view the profile from above......very simple to make and use. The only disadvantage to this, is they are quick to be covered by chips while turning, but very useful for a short period of time, or just a quick look at the profile.

The third one is for viewing the profile from the horizontal perspective. It's a bit more involved to make, but convenient to use while actually turning, because it's position won't allow chips to obscure the view quickly. It's simply installed by a wedge piece of wood that fits between the bedways. (No tools required to install.)

All three are easy to install, and use......and, the benefits of seeing the profile clearly is well worth their regular use. :D

ooc

Photos, L to R:
A) All three
B) Horizontal view
C) Large piece on bedway
D) Small piece on top of banjo
 

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For the one on the wall glue a piece of white laminate on the wall it's easy to keep clean & will brighten up the room. Or again get out the roller & brush & paint that whole shop white.
 

odie

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For the one on the wall glue a piece of white laminate on the wall it's easy to keep clean & will brighten up the room. Or again get out the roller & brush & paint that whole shop white.

Permanent surfaces won't work for long........that is, if you turn wet woods.

I did see a suggestion from someone else that also sounds pretty good. He used an old fashioned white roll-up window blind, which was removed after use. I might have tried that myself if I hadn't already had this jig that works fine.

ooc
 

odie

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Getting new life out of your old scratchy face shield......

I believe this face shield I've been using is about 15 years old, or so. When I first bought it, I also purchased two new replacements for the plastic lens .......but, I have yet to use one of the replacements! I've been polishing up the same old original lens for years!

The two-step scratch remover and polishing compounds are called Novus 1, and Novus 2. Although I got the Novus compounds at a Harley Davidson dealer for use on plastic motorcycle windshields, these same compounds are available at a hardware store.

I've made up a little "kit" for doing the job.

There is a large pad of close knit rug material used as a backer under the face shield while the scratches are being removed. Also I've converted an old 3" sanding disc backer with a round piece of the same close knit rug material. This, when installed on your drill motor, is used against a piece of folded soft cotton t-shirt material for application of the Novus compounds.

The whole job takes less than ten minutes, and you're good to go for another six months, or so. :D

ooc
 

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Odie

The LOML made a bag out of an old bath towel for my shield I just blow the shield off run it under the faucet & dry it & slip it in the bag to keep it from getting scratched when not in use.
 

odie

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Odie

The LOML made a bag out of an old bath towel for my shield I just blow the shield off run it under the faucet & dry it & slip it in the bag to keep it from getting scratched when not in use.

Sounds good, Bart......

Do you put your face shield in the bag every time you take it off and put it on, while working in the shop? How about when you rough wet bowl stock? That mess usually doesn't simply wipe off cleanly.

I usually hang my FS on the lathe tail stock, and it's on and off about a dozen times in a shop session. That, it seems is where the majority of the abuse and scratching happens. It probably wouldn't be a bad idea to cover it up when I'm not in the shop.......:D

ooc
 
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Sounds good, Bart......

Do you put your face shield in the bag every time you take it off and put it on, while working in the shop? How about when you rough wet bowl stock? That mess usually doesn't simply wipe off cleanly.

I usually hang my FS on the lathe tail stock, and it's on and off about a dozen times in a shop session. That, it seems is where the majority of the abuse and scratching happens. It probably wouldn't be a bad idea to cover it up when I'm not in the shop.......:D

ooc

I hung the FS up high & back away where it would be safe & I've only turned dry wood so far.
 
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Attached are two photos of my 1224 workspace as it existed in my basement. It now resides in a rented Mill Space in pretty much the same form

I found that the 1224's top (beneath the ways) was too narrow for my purposes and way of working. So I built a little shelf to keep my tools from slipping off the lathe. The shelf also has some storage space for projects and a light

The wider shot shows the tool racks on the wall behind the lathe

Angelo

And the wood chips, where are they don't they accumulate in the tray?
 

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Wood chips mostly go the other way. Sanding dust is another matter, however, the shop vac has to be used to pick up stuff all around the lathe so the tray doesn't present itself as a special problem. In my case, instead of the shop vac, it's the air hose since my "studio" is the great outdoors.
 

odie

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Attached are two photos of my 1224 workspace as it existed in my basement. It now resides in a rented Mill Space in pretty much the same form

I found that the 1224's top (beneath the ways) was too narrow for my purposes and way of working. So I built a little shelf to keep my tools from slipping off the lathe. The shelf also has some storage space for projects and a light

The wider shot shows the tool racks on the wall behind the lathe

Angelo

FYI.......for a quick link to the photos being discussed:

If you click on that little blue box next to Angelo's name, it will bring you directly to the Angelo's original post, which includes the photos of his shop.

:cool2:

ooc
 
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So Odie you now have no excuse do it now paint that mole hole shop white keep on until you get it right. I meant bright no more shadows lots a light fight fight fight until you get it right.
 
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Wood chips mostly go the other way. Sanding dust is another matter, however, the shop vac has to be used to pick up stuff all around the lathe so the tray doesn't present itself as a special problem. In my case, instead of the shop vac, it's the air hose since my "studio" is the great outdoors.

Also when one cores a bowl?
 

odie

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So Odie you now have no excuse do it now paint that mole hole shop white keep on until you get it right. I meant bright no more shadows lots a light fight fight fight until you get it right.

Forget it, Bart.......:D

As I said before, if I could go back and paint the walls white, while the shop was under construction, I would do that. For now, I'm not willing to tear down the entire shop to have some limited lighting benefit. The current combination of fluorescent, incandescent and spot lighting is very good without the walls being white, and I don't consider it a limitation that justifies the effort required to paint the walls.....

Your post seems a bit unusual.......celebrating the Labor Day weekend, are we?

ooc
 
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odie

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Trying to steer the thread back in the right direction.........:D

Here is a two-position angle sander cradle I made up. For quite a long time, I used a simple plywood board, but the sanders were not stable enough to be problem free in the original configuration. It was too easy to accidently bump the sanders and knock them off. Since making the "cradles", I couldn't be happier with this set-up.:D

ooc

The first two pics are of the lathe table with sander cradles as they are now.
The 3rd pic is of the table as it was a few years ago. The last pic shows how the table is positioned between the bedways......quick on and off.
 

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Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004859/7706/WoodRiver-2-Bowl-Sander.aspx
 

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Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004859/7706/WoodRiver-2-Bowl-Sander.aspx

The problem with inertia sanders is that the require..... Inertia. At the outside of the bowls, angling the sander and it works fine. On the inside the surface feet per minute speed is slower and the sanding is really slow. The solution is to speed up the piece and have at it, but then the outer rims you want to transition into are going too fast.
Even if you go to a Harbor Freight electric angle drill it would be more useful and controllable IMHO
 
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odie

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Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004859/7706/WoodRiver-2-Bowl-Sander.aspx

Bart.......

I have an inertia sander like you linked to. My experience was unsatisfactory, as was with Steve's findings. You should probably get one since they're fairly cheap. Use it for awhile and come to your own conclusions about it.

As for the Sioux and Milwaukee angle drills, you should get one of those too.....that is, if you ever plan on making bowls with inward facing walls. A regular drill works fine with gradual outward facing walls, but the angle drill works for everything. A get-together at a BBQ just isn't enough experience with these to make the judgment call on the usefulness of this kind of drill for sanding bowls. Use it two-handed braced against a solid block of wood.......you'll be amazed at how well this kind of angle drill works for sanding on the lathe.....:D

Here are some examples of bowls that you just can't sand with a conventional drill. This is what I mean when I say "inward" turned walls.....

ooc
 

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Bill Boehme

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Also when one cores a bowl?

The shavings come out of the slot directly above the cutter and then drop straight down. However, when you get more than a couple inches into the slot, the shavings tend to stay in the kerf until the cutter is pulled back. So basically, the shavings are well behaved -- all going into a neat little pile directly beneath the cutter.
 
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The shavings come out of the slot directly above the cutter and then drop straight down. However, when you get more than a couple inches into the slot, the shavings tend to stay in the kerf until the cutter is pulled back. So basically, the shavings are well behaved -- all going into a neat little pile directly beneath the cutter.

Thank you for your answer, but my shavings do better: they fall directly in the big yellow scoop that Odie has shown and I just bought.
 
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Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

Odie
Don't know whether you caught it or not.

On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.
 

odie

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Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
Looks like a great way to control the sanders.

Odie
Don't know whether you caught it or not.

On to another problem. I tried using a sander like those at a turners get together BBQ etc. I found them to big in the body to handle comfortably so I purchased a Craftsman angle drill that has a long body with thee motor on the tail end. I also want to try one of the sanders that are driven by the lathe turning.

Hi Bart.......

Are you yelling........again? Heh,heh,heh........:D

Yep, you are right......I missed the point that you had purchased an angle drill. This is what works. Did you get a ninety degree angle drill? Forty-five degrees are better for inward slanting walls, because it gets out of the way much easier.......but you can update us when you have made a few bowls like the ones I've shown above........

ooc
 

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Sometimes second effort is essential to progress.......

In the case of face protection, this is the case.

Originally, I modified a hockey helmet for those bowls where I felt there was substantial risk of it coming apart on the lathe. That was pretty good, but I decided to try again.

The second effort was made from a women's softball league fielder's mask. After having used it on several occasions, the fielder's mask is now my "go to" face protection. After brazing some additional steel protection, I'm very satisfied with this form of occasional protection, and the modifications.

One distinct advantage to the fielder's mask, is it will fit comfortably underneath my normal face shield.

Note: The photo showing the fielder's mask under the face shield was taken prior to the modifications.

ooc
 

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odie

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I've always had trouble bringing wood chips into the house, and a portion of those have been brought in via the tops and lacing of my shoes and socks. When I saw "the shoe bib" being offered by Woodcraft, I added a pair of them to my next order.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2082427/31460/Woodcraft-The-Shoe-Bib-Desert-Camo.aspx

What a waste of money that was! Those shoe bibs suffer from a bad design, and the skirts stick out far enough to be a tripping hazard. You could step on the skirt of the opposite shoe. Not only that, but they are not that easy to strap on, because you have to reach around to the backside, or heel of your shoe with both hands to secure the Velcro tabs.

Anyway, the idea was real good, and they did solve a problem that landed me in the doghouse a number of times. The idea occurred to cut off the pant legs of an old pair of sweatpants. These are installed upside down on your lower legs and cover your shoes and socks. They are pretty easy to put on and off, but it does require the shoes to be removed to make the installation.......for me, no problem.

The shoe bibs are what gave me the inspiration for the cut-off sweat pant idea......too bad I had to waste my money to arrive at that idea! The sweat pant legs work like a charm! :cool2:

My shoes, being the vehicle to transport wood chips into the house, is now solved for good!

Now, I need a solution to the chips that I carry into the house in my hair! Some of those end up in the bed! :eek:

The first photo is of my shoe bibs from Woodcraft, and the second photo is the final solution to an age-old problem! :D

ooc
 

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You say you have shavings in your hair ...that is a bit of a sticky wicket isn't it. Solution vacuum or air blow your hair with your eyes closed...jump in the shower & wash it. Ta Da no shavings in the bed. Or you could just sleep with the dog in the dog house. You'd stay warm & the dog wouldn't care about the shavings. Ha Ha...

On 3rd thought maybe a surgical cap. Hello Dr. Odie

I can hear it now Dr. Odie to the lathe STAT.....for an operation you don't want to miss. You say at 1700 RPM you removed his WHAT ?????

I can just see Dr. Odie in surgical garb with a stethoscope around his neck & the neighbors neck hanging out & the questions....& the answer from Dr. Odie don't worry it a new type of operation.

Operation Mr. Clean.
 
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odie

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You say their you have shavings in your hair ...that is a bit of a sticky wicket isn't it. Solution vacuum or air blow your hair with your eyes closed...jump in the shower & wash it. Ta Da no shavings in the bed. Or you could just sleep with the dog in the dog house. You'd stay warm & the dog wouldn't care about the shavings. Ha Ha...

On 3rd thought maybe a surgical cap. Hello Dr. Odie

I can hear it now Dr. Odie to the lathe STAT.....for an operation you don't want to miss. You say at 1700 RPM you removed his WHAT ?????

I can just see Dr. Odie in surgical garb with a stethoscope around his neck & the neighbors neck hanging out & the questions....& the answer from Dr. Odie don't worry it a new type of operation.

Operation Mr. Clean.

Heh,heh,heh......ok, you made me lol, Bart.......:D

You know, I have been using a blast of air on my hair......but, it's not a fool proof strategy. Those with short hair don't have as much trouble as I do.......but, at this stage of my life, I'm thankful to still have hair at all! :)

With that long beard of yours, you probably have to jump through some hoops to keep the peace, as well! :D

Later.......

ooc
 

AlanZ

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Odie,

Have patience... if you wait long enough, hair might be gone...
 
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Heh,heh,heh......ok, you made me lol, Bart.......:D

You know, I have been using a blast of air on my hair......but, it's not a fool proof strategy. Those with short hair don't have as much trouble as I do.......but, at this stage of my life, I'm thankful to still have hair at all! :)

With that long beard of yours, you probably have to jump through some hoops to keep the peace, as well! :D

Later.......


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGa9IvpooKI
 
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Odie

I don't seem to have much problem with my beard when I turn. Of course if I don't turn to fast I don't get dizzy & fall down either.

Something I found out by trial was I can wear a 3M filter mask over my beard for turning & sanding & I get along fine it filters well & the allergies don't act up & my sinuses don't close up. Kinda funny lookin with the 3M & work-tunes head set & a face shield on. I walked into the house with all this on thinking my dachshunds would go nuts they just wagged their tails with a look like we know its you what are you trying to pull this time.

Did I ever mention the LOML made a sack type cover for my face shield out of an old bath towel stitched up in the shape of a pillow case. When finished turning I blow the shield off then run it under the faucet carefully dry it & put it in the sack & it's protected.
 

odie

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Odie

I don't seem to have much problem with my beard when I turn. Of course if I don't turn to fast I don't get dizzy & fall down either.

Something I found out by trial was I can wear a 3M filter mask over my beard for turning & sanding & I get along fine it filters well & the allergies don't act up & my sinuses don't close up. Kinda funny lookin with the 3M & work-tunes head set & a face shield on. I walked into the house with all this on thinking my dachshunds would go nuts they just wagged their tails with a look like we know its you what are you trying to pull this time.

Did I ever mention the LOML made a sack type cover for my face shield out of an old bath towel stitched up in the shape of a pillow case. When finished turning I blow the shield off then run it under the faucet carefully dry it & put it in the sack & it's protected.

Bart.......

Although I'm clean shaven, and the last time I had a beard was around 30, or so years ago......your idea of wearing the 3M filter mask over your beard sounds like an idea of some interest to other turners.

Yes, I believe you did mention the sack you keep your face shield at some time in the past......also sounds like a good idea.

I invite you to take some pics of these things and post here......I'm sure there are other turners who would be interested in seeing them.......:D

ooc



Odie,

Have patience... if you wait long enough, hair might be gone...

Heh,heh,heh........Alan, that's exactly what I'm afraid of. There is this little bald spot in the back of my head that's been growing for the past few years! Oh well, I guess this is the price I must pay for maturity!........:rolleyes:

ooc
 
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odie

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I purchased one of these Gel Pro anti-fatigue work mats a couple months ago, and I'm truly amazed on how great it is! This mat is very cushiony, and a great addition to my shop. I regularly stand for hours at my place of employment, and come home to stand for more hours at home in my shop. Sometimes on week-ends, I'll spend time standing for 12+ hours at a time.......and, my old feet needed something, other than the cheap mat and insole inserts I had been using.

I hesitated and contemplated a lot before spending the money on this mat......they are very expensive. After using it for a couple months, I'm completely sold on how valuable it will be in the coming years! (Sort of how I complained about the Tompkins Gage T being expensive, but forgot all about the money, once I put it to use! :D)

There is a video available here:
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...co-Pro-Anti-Fatigue-Work-Mat?term=fatigue+mat

ooc
 

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Try Boots

I've always had trouble bringing wood chips into the house, and a portion of those have been brought in via the tops and lacing of my shoes and socks. When I saw "the shoe bib" being offered by Woodcraft, I added a pair of them to my next order.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2082427/31460/Woodcraft-The-Shoe-Bib-Desert-Camo.aspx

What a waste of money that was! Those shoe bibs suffer from a bad design, and the skirts stick out far enough to be a tripping hazard. You could step on the skirt of the opposite shoe. Not only that, but they are not that easy to strap on, because you have to reach around to the backside, or heel of your shoe with both hands to secure the Velcro tabs.

Anyway, the idea was real good, and they did solve a problem that landed me in the doghouse a number of times. The idea occurred to cut off the pant legs of an old pair of sweatpants. These are installed upside down on your lower legs and cover your shoes and socks. They are pretty easy to put on and off, but it does require the shoes to be removed to make the installation.......for me, no problem.

The shoe bibs are what gave me the inspiration for the cut-off sweat pant idea......too bad I had to waste my money to arrive at that idea! The sweat pant legs work like a charm! :cool2:

My shoes, being the vehicle to transport wood chips into the house, is now solved for good!

Now, I need a solution to the chips that I carry into the house in my hair! Some of those end up in the bed! :eek:

The first photo is of my shoe bibs from Woodcraft, and the second photo is the final solution to an age-old problem! :D

ooc

I solved this years ago. I always wear boots in the shop and yard. You can take them off easill with a kick at the door. Wearing Justin work boots last 5 years.
 
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