• Beware of Counterfeit Woodturning Tools (click here for details)
  • Congratulations to Christine Smith for "Flower Spin Tops" being selected as Turning of the Week for February 19, 2024 (click here for details)
  • Johnathan Silwones is starting a new AAW chapter, Southern Alleghenies Woodturners, in Johnstown, PA. (click here for details)
  • Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Useful shop gadgets.....shop, and "evolving shop" photos......

Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
14
Likes
0
Location
Marietta
I'm for it

After using it for a couple months, I'm completely sold on how valuable it will be in the coming years! (Sort of how I complained about the Tompkins Gage T being expensive, but forgot all about the money, once I put it to use! :D)

There is a video available here:
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...co-Pro-Anti-Fatigue-Work-Mat?term=fatigue+mat

ooc

Odie, I learned the value of gel cushions when I did a lot of bicycle riding, and invested in gloves and a seat cushion with gel. Easier on the hands, and my arse was equally sore, instead of direly sore in three spots:).

That shop in the video was way to clean, I thought the idea was to stand on 3 inches of shavings.
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Odie, I learned the value of gel cushions when I did a lot of bicycle riding, and invested in gloves and a seat cushion with gel. Easier on the hands, and my arse was equally sore, instead of direly sore in three spots:).

That shop in the video was way to clean, I thought the idea was to stand on 3 inches of shavings.

I know what you're saying, John.......

I'm a bicycle rider myself, during good weather and seasons. Never tried gel on the seat, but do have gel gloves.....they are a good thing to have.

This Gel Pro mat is very thick....about 3/4". I'm really surprised just how well it works......wish I had gotten one of these years ago!

ooc
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
This little piece of rubber mat with attached magnets to the back has turned out to be one of the handiest aids! Magnets are simply attached with hot glue.

I use this as a cushion for bracing my body for a more precise, or controlled cut. Much of the time, body movement is from the entire body, but there are times when I want to brace a knee, hip, thigh or elbow for a particular cut, and the bit of cushion for my body parts is a great convenience.

So simple, yet so useful! :cool2:

ooc
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0682.JPG
    IMG_0682.JPG
    480.2 KB · Views: 119
  • IMG_0683.JPG
    IMG_0683.JPG
    468.4 KB · Views: 111
  • IMG_0684.JPG
    IMG_0684.JPG
    323.1 KB · Views: 111
  • IMG_0685.JPG
    IMG_0685.JPG
    365.9 KB · Views: 124
Last edited:
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
257
Likes
2,139
Location
Davison, Michigan
Website
jpseyfried.com
I saw this at the Ohio Valley Woodturners Association Symposium, it is called a rubber chucky. This one is the mini reverse chucky; I also bought a 6" extension. It is a big improvement over the wooden ones I was making for each HF.

I have also "upgraded' the shop with a couple of clear shower curtains. Both are hung on cables, one in front of the lathe (slightly visible in the background) and one behind. They both help with the wood chip mess.
 

Attachments

  • rubberchucky.jpg
    rubberchucky.jpg
    105.4 KB · Views: 285

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
James.......How are you securing the bottom of the HF? Are you using something chucked into the tailstock?

Matt......Very creative thinking, and looks like a great job of making it happen! That also looks like it could be very useful as an emergency stop.

Thanks to you both for showing us something inspirational! :cool2:

ooc
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
257
Likes
2,139
Location
Davison, Michigan
Website
jpseyfried.com
James.......How are you securing the bottom of the HF? Are you using something chucked into the tailstock?

ooc

I usually use a Sorby revolving center with the tailstock to remove the tenon from the bottom of the HF. I have used the stock one but the Sorby set gives me more options and I think more room for cleaning up the bottom. It also has a flat tip that I have used to hold the piece for sanding. However, I want to come up with a rubber tip for that purpose. I think Rubberchucky has tips fro the tailstock too, probably should have got one.
 

hockenbery

Forum MVP
Beta Tester
TOTW Team
Joined
Apr 27, 2004
Messages
8,530
Likes
4,808
Location
Lakeland, Florida
Website
www.hockenberywoodturning.com
I usually use a Sorby revolving center with the tailstock to remove the tenon from the bottom of the HF. I have used the stock one but the Sorby set gives me more options and I think more room for cleaning up the bottom. It also has a flat tip that I have used to hold the piece for sanding. However, I want to come up with a rubber tip for that purpose. I think Rubberchucky has tips fro the tailstock too, probably should have got one.

I have two solutions you might try. I glued a piece of leather on the tip of a flat metal live center insert. It does not mar the wood. With the rough side of the leather it holds better than the metal too.

A second solution is I have wooden covers for the live center with leather glued on the tips. A 1 1/2 inch hole fits over the mini lathe centers if it is loose a wrap with masking tape makes a tight fit. I then turn the outside to a flat point 1/2 diameter ( make a slight recess in the tip) and glue on a piece of leather with thick CA. I use this when I do ball demos and I have set for use in workshops. I have a bunch to fit the ONEWAY center too. 5/8" hole?? And 3 wraps of masking tape.

I also have a bunch of rubber chunky cones and other shapes that screw onto the ONEWAY live centers.
Don Doyle the rubber chucky innovator was a long time member of our woodturning club and he has a great product.
The material Don uses in the casting can be turned to suit for special applications.

Al
 
Last edited:

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Oneway Jumbo Jaws hole selection jig.........

This summer, I made up a little jig that is working out very well for me, and am now sharing this idea with the rest of you. Some may not have a need, or be able to apply it to their own shop procedures, and a few of you will find it very helpful and beneficial.

For the past twenty years, I've been using a chart that gives the usable sizes for hole selection for placing the rubber grippers on the Jumbo jaws. There is nothing wrong with using the chart. It works fine, but the new jig works a little faster, and less confusing when it comes to critical choices between two rubber gripper positions. This is especially true if you are processing bowls in batches through this stage of completion.

You can see there are overlapping areas of application for the rubber gripper placement. One thing I've always done is use the largest hole on the Jumbo Jaw plates that will apply when two choices are available. This is a safety concern, because the chuck jaws are in the most compact position. This safety aspect applies to either expand, or contract mode......use the largest hole that works.

The left side of the jig is aligned to either the outside edge, or inside edge of the left side of the bowl, and the reading is taken on the right corresponding edge of the bowl as indicated on the jig......simple to use, and simple to get it right every time. :D

ooc
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0687.JPG
    IMG_0687.JPG
    316.5 KB · Views: 214
  • IMG_0688.JPG
    IMG_0688.JPG
    127.8 KB · Views: 191
  • IMG_0689.JPG
    IMG_0689.JPG
    134.1 KB · Views: 162

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Odie thanks for posting your drill adjustment technique. I plan on doing something like that for my depth adjustment, it sure beats a piece of tape.

You are certainly welcome, Breck.......

......and, thanks to Mike Peace for the advice of using a shorter drill bit in his post #21. After using the shorter 3/8" drill bit for a time, it's a much better alternative than the long 3/16" bit I has been using as the second depth drill.

For deeper bowls, the long 3/8" bit is still the "go to" depth drill.

It's great when I can help out another turner on these forums......but, it's fantastic, when ideas from other turners can turn me on to something that improves my own turning efforts! :D:D

For a one time use, I still use the old tape method you are using.....just not on the depth drill. It works, and is quick and easy for those other times a particular depth of drilling is needed.

ooc
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0473.jpg
    IMG_0473.jpg
    511 KB · Views: 170
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Messages
325
Likes
732
Location
Gulfport, MS
Website
www.woodtreasuresbybreck.com
Made me a depth stop today

Hi Odie,
Just wanted to let you know I made one today and used it already when roughing a nice wet deep sycamore bowl. Thanks, I love a good jig and have a few but it seems the simple ones are the best sometimes. I am always looking to get better and learn how to do something easier if I can.
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Hi Odie,
Just wanted to let you know I made one today and used it already when roughing a nice wet deep sycamore bowl. Thanks, I love a good jig and have a few but it seems the simple ones are the best sometimes. I am always looking to get better and learn how to do something easier if I can.

Excellent, Breck........:cool2:

I see you don't need them durned "round tuits" for motivation......good on you!:D

ooc
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
5,376
Likes
2,738
Location
Eugene, OR
One thing I have added to my arsenal is a wire wheel on one of my grinders. Great for removing gunk from my tools. I have been turning a lot of madrone, and it sprays out a lot of really sticky stuff. Maybe not sap, but it gunks up everything. It won't wipe off if it sits for more than about 5 minutes, so the wire wheel takes it off really quickly.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Messages
325
Likes
732
Location
Gulfport, MS
Website
www.woodtreasuresbybreck.com
One thing I have added to my arsenal is a wire wheel on one of my grinders. Great for removing gunk from my tools. I have been turning a lot of madrone, and it sprays out a lot of really sticky stuff. Maybe not sap, but it gunks up everything. It won't wipe off if it sits for more than about 5 minutes, so the wire wheel takes it off really quickly.

robo hippy

I have often wondered if anyone else uses a wire wheel like I do. I also found it to be a good way for removing "the gunk" when it gets hardened on my tools. It really is a quick and effective method of cleaning them right before sharpening.
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
I have often wondered if anyone else uses a wire wheel like I do. I also found it to be a good way for removing "the gunk" when it gets hardened on my tools. It really is a quick and effective method of cleaning them right before sharpening.

A motor driven wire wheel will do the job quickly, but I've evolved to using brass and steel wire brushes that are about the size of your toothbrush. The reason I've switched, is because I've been worried that the wire wheel might be a bit too aggressive. If the surface profile of the gouge acquires any imperfections, it will directly effect the quality of the edge that tool is capable of. There are a few times when the wire brass brush doesn't get some thick hardened debris in the flute. If not, I proceed to the steel wire toothbrush. If both of those fail to do the job, then I've made up a special tool with a curved edge out of an old screwdriver that quickly pops off any stubborn debris pronto.

:D This might be one of those times where I worry too much!......but, if I were to go back to a motor driven wire wheel, I'd definitely look for one with brass bristles.

ooc
 
Joined
Sep 8, 2005
Messages
303
Likes
13
Odie,
Try a brass wire wheel. I forget where I bought mine but it works great. For the stubborn gunk that eon't come off use a few drops of wd40 and then the brass wire wheel.
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Messages
325
Likes
732
Location
Gulfport, MS
Website
www.woodtreasuresbybreck.com
Heat in the deep south problem solved

I live in Gulfport MS and the heat in my large uninsulated wood shop makes it miserable to attempt turning in all but about two months a year. I would sweat all over the lathe and my tools. I couldn't afford to insulate and cool a 30 x 40 shop. My solution was a cold room inside my shop. I built an 8 x 12 framed room with a 36" door. I built it around my 3520B lathe then put building wrap on the inside walls to handle the wet spray and curlies. I put 3/4" tounge & groove foam insulation board R-4 around the outside of the 2x4frame. I framed in a hole for a small a/c window unit I had and I now have a wonderful cold room for turning. I have been turning in it for quite a while and it works exceptionally well. If you had a floor unit with dual heating option it would work for cold areas also. I vent with my dust collector through a hole in one wall. I have an air cleaning unit I am building to put in the ceiling for dust. When turning I always use my trend air-pro face shield. Just thought this might be a help to others who were in the same spot I was in. I hope this idea helps others like it did me when a friend suggested it.
 

Attachments

  • Cold room #1.jpg
    Cold room #1.jpg
    72.4 KB · Views: 259
  • Cold room #2.jpg
    Cold room #2.jpg
    73.3 KB · Views: 261
  • Cold room #3.jpg
    Cold room #3.jpg
    68.8 KB · Views: 261
  • Cold room #4.jpg
    Cold room #4.jpg
    68.7 KB · Views: 264
Joined
Aug 14, 2007
Messages
5,376
Likes
2,738
Location
Eugene, OR
Steel wire wheels won't take off any steel, though they will remove paint and gunk in general, and will take off a burr. I have had wires come off and do stand out of the line of fire, and keep glasses on. The only difficulty with the wire wheel is some times if you roll an edge of some thing into it the wrong way, it is rather grabby. Interesting note, I was playing with a rag trying to get the wire wheel to grab it, and it wouldn't.

robo hippy
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
257
Likes
2,139
Location
Davison, Michigan
Website
jpseyfried.com
Reach sanding ball improvement

I recently bought a Reach sanding ball to sand the interior of vases and hollow forms. It worked pretty good with the Abranet sanding disks. Then while sanding a deep vase the disk fell off. While looking at the velcro it occurred to me that I could add velcro strips to hold the Abernet better. Not only does it hold it better it gives more sanding surface and is easily replaceable. It's a nice tool, but if this one wears out I will save my money and make one. In fact I think it might be be nice to make some with different size heads for different interior shapes.

As the vase was deeper than the handle was long, I found that it would fit in the handle I have for hollowing equipment. I also used a hollowing bar to hold a 2" sanding disk.

The vase is 15" deep and I would say the limit for my abilities with a Monster Hollowing system.
 

Attachments

  • sandstk347.jpg
    sandstk347.jpg
    403.2 KB · Views: 257
  • sandstk349.jpg
    sandstk349.jpg
    98.3 KB · Views: 254
Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
198
Likes
7
Location
Boulder City, NV
OK, I got nosy, and had to have a poke around your shop too :rolleyes:
really like the idea of making the listing with the opening/closing jaw measurements
great idea, and dunno why I hadn't thought of that yet ;-)

James, they sell a version of Abranet pads that are hook & loop already, just bought some for my palm sander
was either thu Woodcraft or Craft USA, don't remember which and not sure if they have them in the 2" sizes though .........
are you happy with the Reach sanding ball? a worthwhile investment?

nice shop set-up odie :)
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
257
Likes
2,139
Location
Davison, Michigan
Website
jpseyfried.com
James, they sell a version of Abranet pads that are hook & loop already, just bought some for my palm sander
was either thu Woodcraft or Craft USA, don't remember which and not sure if they have them in the 2" sizes though .........
are you happy with the Reach sanding ball? a worthwhile investment?

All the Abranet that I have is hook & loop already too…perhaps I worded my post poorly. What I did was add more velcro to hold larger disks better. The Reach sanding ball is nice, however I had originally thought it would go in my angle drill for power sanding. It is too large for the chuck and would probably be too hard to control at that length. It was a worthwhile investment when I was working 12 hrs 7 days a week, now that I'm retired I would make one and save some money.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
198
Likes
7
Location
Boulder City, NV
Thanks James, wasn't sure if there was a specific advantage over buying, than making one
now I know to make my own and save the money :)
 
Joined
Jul 9, 2006
Messages
42
Likes
0
Location
WA State
Website
www.etsy.com
A heat box for finishes

Odie, this is a great thread,with lots of useful information. Thanks for starting it.

The most useful thing I've made in my shop has been a heated, insulated box to keep finishes and adhesives at a decent temperature during the winter months. I built it tall and thin to fit a space open behind my lathe, and my SO George wired a light bulb base on the bottom to a thermostat on top so I can adjust the temperature. Even with this winter's deep cold, going for weeks at single-digit temps, it has kept the contents at or above 45ºF consistently. For the insulation, I bought cheap foam board at Walmart and tacked it in to fit between the shelves and on the inside of the door and back. Rare earth magnets hold the door closed, though I also attached a hook and eye closure later. It is one of those 'I should have done this years ago' items, and I wouldn't want to be without it.

FinishBxClose copy.jpg FinishBxLoaded copy.jpg FinishBxOpLight copy.jpg
 
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
185
Likes
26
Location
Ladner British Columbia
Website
woodbowlsandthings.wordpress.com
Useful?

I read through all 15 pages to try to be certain that I wash't stepping on anyones toes.
Not sure where I saw this but I now believe it is one of the best time savers I have in my shop.
I used to have a lot of trouble getting to the bottom of a hollow form and getting rid of that little 'nib' that I often left until I came across this solution.
I used to use forester bits but depending on the wood they are slow and they often plug up like this. Needing frequent removal to clear.
IMG_2751.jpg
Now I start with a forester, and then choose the same size modified speed bit like this.
Cuts easy once started and leaves a nice rounded bottom.
IMG_2752.jpg
It seems that as long as I drill far enough to catch the sides of the spade bit it stays nice and straight.

Odie, with all the helpful hints you could probably write a book!!!

Thanks for all this.

Ps. I wonder just how much time you have to turn AFTER all the time you must spend on making jigs and other helpful items?
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
198
Likes
7
Location
Boulder City, NV
Pete, pretty cool modification of the speed bore bits, and makes it tons easier to sharpen manually
like the idea, wondered how steady/stable they'd be, but I'd think if you kept the profile shaped nicely then there'd be no issues.
Have a couple wasted speed bores that I'll try this on!
Thanks for the tip & the pic! ;)
 

hockenbery

Forum MVP
Beta Tester
TOTW Team
Joined
Apr 27, 2004
Messages
8,530
Likes
4,808
Location
Lakeland, Florida
Website
www.hockenberywoodturning.com
Twist drill with morse taper

Pete,

Good idea. I don't like the holes made by the point of a Forstner or a spade bit.
Your rounding solves that.

I use a 1" twist drill with a morse taper. Doesn't need a chuck and it drills pretty straight from start to finish.

I bought my but from wholesale tools for about $12 in 2004.
It is easy to sharpen on a grinding wheel.

Another way to get the same results. Your hole may be a little more rounded.
Thanks for sharing
Al
 
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
185
Likes
26
Location
Ladner British Columbia
Website
woodbowlsandthings.wordpress.com
Wolverine

I have one more tip that has saved me much time and effort.
I have the Wolverine sharpening system as I'm certain a lot of you do as well.
One one side I have a Robo Rest which I find is super. I keep a chart of angles I use for various tools on a board hanging under the sharpener so I can refer to it really quickly.
When I sharpen bowl gouges and detail spindle gouges I use the other wheel but I was constantly making minor adjustments to get it just right. I use a differnt settings for each type of gouge and have now drilled a 1/8 hole through the sliding arm so I can instantly get exact repeatable results. Oh, this tip will only work if one uses A CBN wheel.
I used to use a felt marker on the cutting edge of the gouge to get the set-up just right but now all I have to do is install a pin through the hole I drilled.
I could include a photo if anyone is interested.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2014
Messages
198
Likes
7
Location
Boulder City, NV
John, very cool idea, and thanks for taking the time to create the video
I like how you created the extra block so you never have to change the degree angle of the jig
That's been my biggest issue, getting the arm in the correct position depending on what you're sharpening......
Now have the raptor CBN,which has made an awesome difference in grind/edge,
will spend the afternoon creating my own jigs, will make life much easier in future :)
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Odie, this is a great thread,with lots of useful information. Thanks for starting it.

The most useful thing I've made in my shop has been a heated, insulated box to keep finishes and adhesives at a decent temperature during the winter months. I built it tall and thin to fit a space open behind my lathe, and my SO George wired a light bulb base on the bottom to a thermostat on top so I can adjust the temperature. Even with this winter's deep cold, going for weeks at single-digit temps, it has kept the contents at or above 45ºF consistently. For the insulation, I bought cheap foam board at Walmart and tacked it in to fit between the shelves and on the inside of the door and back. Rare earth magnets hold the door closed, though I also attached a hook and eye closure later. It is one of those 'I should have done this years ago' items, and I wouldn't want to be without it.

View attachment 7144 View attachment 7146 View attachment 7145

Thank you for showing us your heat box, Barb......that is a really terrific idea, and I'm going to follow your cue and do something like this......great! :D

Yes, this thread has been great......there have been several entries that made me change my evil ways! Ha! Just kidding, but I really do appreciate the input of others here, especially when they encourage me to make things just a little bit better in my own shop! :cool:

ooc
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
I read through all 15 pages to try to be certain that I wash't stepping on anyones toes.
Not sure where I saw this but I now believe it is one of the best time savers I have in my shop.
I used to have a lot of trouble getting to the bottom of a hollow form and getting rid of that little 'nib' that I often left until I came across this solution.
I used to use forester bits but depending on the wood they are slow and they often plug up like this. Needing frequent removal to clear.
View attachment 7162
Now I start with a forester, and then choose the same size modified speed bit like this.
Cuts easy once started and leaves a nice rounded bottom.
View attachment 7163
It seems that as long as I drill far enough to catch the sides of the spade bit it stays nice and straight.

Odie, with all the helpful hints you could probably write a book!!!

Thanks for all this.

Ps. I wonder just how much time you have to turn AFTER all the time you must spend on making jigs and other helpful items?

Pete.......thanks!

I also really do appreciate the input of others on this thread......:cool:

Don't think I could write a book......I'm too busy doing everything else!

I hoped this thread would inspire some really useful things that myself, and other turners could use......it looks like it's a success! :D

Thanks for this really great tip you are including here.......

ooc
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Just a little tip here for those turners that frequently rough bowls with a high moisture content. I keep a peanut container near my tool rests that has an oil soaked rag......plain old motor oil. when I'm finished with a wet roughed bowl, I normally take a dry rag and wipe down the lathe and tool rest. After that, I take the oil soaked rag and give the bedways, lathe components, and tool rests a rub with the oil soaked rag. This has effectively kept rust from forming for the past twenty+ years. It's quick and easy to do......:D

ooc
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1011.JPG
    IMG_1011.JPG
    281.2 KB · Views: 79
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
2,916
Likes
1,849
Location
Brandon, MS
Just a little tip here for those turners that frequently rough bowls with a high moisture content. I keep a peanut container near my tool rests that has an oil soaked rag......plain old motor oil. when I'm finished with a wet roughed bowl, I normally take a dry rag and wipe down the lathe and tool rest. After that, I take the oil soaked rag and give the bedways, lathe components, and tool rests a rub with the oil soaked rag. This has effectively kept rust from forming for the past twenty+ years. It's quick and easy to do......:D

ooc

I use WD-40 removes moisture and cleans
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Don't you just hate it when you progress through the grits, or even after the final finish is applied.......and a little scratch mark shows up to ruin what you thought was a perfect finish? I just don't see as well as I used to, and I've also been using trifocals for the past decade, or so. Out of necessity, I can no longer rely on a blast of air to check the fine details of my surface between grits, and final before applying a finish. Using a woodworkers tack cloth after the blast of air will really make a difference in seeing the imperfections. I'm also using a magnifying glass to see better, as well.

(The magnifying glass was salvaged from a magnifying lamp that was being tossed out where I work......real glass, and not one of those "scratch magnet" plastic lenses most magnifying glasses have these days. :mad:)

ooc
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1013.JPG
    IMG_1013.JPG
    492 KB · Views: 116

Mark Hepburn

Artist & Chef
Joined
Mar 26, 2014
Messages
1,621
Likes
577
Location
Houma, Louisiana
Don't you just hate it when you progress through the grits, or even after the final finish is applied.......and a little scratch mark shows up to ruin what you thought was a perfect finish? I just don't see as well as I used to, and I've also been using trifocals for the past decade, or so. Out of necessity, I can no longer rely on a blast of air to check the fine details of my surface between grits, and final before applying a finish. Using a woodworkers tack cloth after the blast of air will really make a difference in seeing the imperfections. I'm also using a magnifying glass to see better, as well.

(The magnifying glass was salvaged from a magnifying lamp that was being tossed out where I work......real glass, and not one of those "scratch magnet" plastic lenses most magnifying glasses have these days. :mad:)

ooc

Odie,

This is a great thread.

I'm a trifocal user too and I'm going to borrow your idea of the magnifying glass for one of these days when my mistakes are too small to be seen with normal vision. For now though, I can see them from across the shop :)

Seriously though, I do like that magnifier idea. And I've used tack cloth forever on my flatwork and it's really helpful. Note to self though, based on some work yesterday, on bocote ya gotta wipe downhill. that's downhill.....
 
Joined
Nov 1, 2012
Messages
115
Likes
0
Location
Tampa, FL
Tired of sawdust and chips in your socks and shoes? You can purchase some "shoe bibs" online from one of the big tool houses, or...
Go to Target, purchase infant bibs (come in sets of 2 for about $5), add a bit of velcro so that it can be snugged up well, and there you go.

photo (23)-r25.jpg

It's important to chose a non-embarrassing print though.
 

odie

TOTW Team
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
7,019
Likes
9,061
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Great idea, Jeff........

Yes, I am one who is plagued by chips in shoes and socks, too. I have a couple of alternate methods, but I'll remember this baby bib idea. Looks like it will do the job. Thank you.

ooc
 
Top