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Woodcut Max3 coring

Joined
Feb 26, 2018
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Nashville, TN
Thinking of changing coring systems and wondered about the Woodcut Max3 system...can't seem to find a US seller. Any information from y'all would be appreciated.
Thanks
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2011
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Elkhart, IN
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www.riccsdesigns.com
I do not own one, BUT I have borrowed my buddy's Woodcut coring system He has the older 2 blade model. The Max 3 has 3 blades. I liked using his 2 blade model so if I was into doing more coring and wanted to buy my own coring rig the Max 3 would be my choice.

It only allows for the basic bowl shape not the versatility of the McNaughton system. But the Woodcut system is wasy easier to use (based on my limited experience with coring)

Ricc
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
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Location
Lebanon, Missouri
I have the 2 blade. Works great, easy to use. There is more flexibility than some might think. Between blade, pivot point location, and entry point selection there is some variation that can be created. My lathe is 16” swing, so I didnt think I could use the larger 3rd blade, but now that I understand its use better I wish I had the Max3. Sorry but I cant help you with availability. I still see some 2 blade but not 3 blade in the US.
 
Joined
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Eugene, OR
If any one has it, it would be Woodworker's Emporium in Las Vegas. I wanted one a while back and they were out of stock and no clue as to when they were going to get more. It is a good system. I have the 2 blade set up. It does have a laser pointer with it. It is fine for softer woods, but for some thing like Osage, it tends to chatter a bit. Attaching it to the tailstock does add some rigidity to the system, but still some flex in it, hence the chattering. I don't use it often because of the necessity of having the tailstock on the lathe. An added step in production work. Can't really tell you if it is more efficient than the Oneway or not, but for sure, the Oneway is rock solid all the way out to the end of the biggest blade they have. I still prefer the McNaughton. Far faster, once you learn how to use it....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2006
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Erie, PA
I have owned all three coring systems. The Woodcut BowlSaver with the 2 blades worked well and they sent me the Max 3 for a review. I cored the hardest piece of Ash with it and it did a good job. The Woodcut BowlSavers are more versatile than you would first think but I opted to keep only the Oneway system. If I could not have the Oneway I would definitely go with the Woodcut product.
 
Joined
Mar 2, 2019
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Location
Hague, VA
Does anyone know why the Max3 is so hard to find? Woodcut sells the 2 blade system on the website but has a statement that they can not sell the Max3 on the website. Reviews are good so makes me wonder what the problem is! Sent 2 emails to Woodcut but no response.
 
Joined
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I was looking to get one a year or so ago, and they were out of stock at Woodworker's Emporium in Las Vegas. They had no idea when new ones would arrive. I am guessing it is some fall out from all of this COVID stuff...

robo hippy
 
Joined
Apr 13, 2017
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Gainesville, VA
I used the McNaughton and the Oneway before settling on the Max3. I have never understood the comment about the lack of flexibility of the Max3 as compared to the other rigs. I found the Max3 to be really quick to setup...and there is a very very small learning curve. On the other hand, there sure is a pretty indepth and ugly learning curve for the McNaughton. In fact, when I first tried it I set it aside for months before giving it another shot. The Oneway is a nice system and I'd probably chose it as my second preference in the event that I couldn't get another Max3.
 
Joined
Jun 25, 2017
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Location
Glenbeulah, Wisconsin
They stopped making the Woodcut Max3 system and are working with customers on a new improved version. "We expect to offer the Max 4 to customers in the next couple of months."
 
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
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Location
Penrose, NC
I used the McNaughton and the Oneway before settling on the Max3. I have never understood the comment about the lack of flexibility of the Max3 as compared to the other rigs. I found the Max3 to be really quick to setup...and there is a very very small learning curve. On the other hand, there sure is a pretty indepth and ugly learning curve for the McNaughton. In fact, when I first tried it I set it aside for months before giving it another shot. The Oneway is a nice system and I'd probably chose it as my second preference in the event that I couldn't get another Max3.
The McNaughton throws most people off - because it requires the opposite force that most expect: you must focus on lifting the handles once you are in the wood. The Oneway and the Woodcut have a "fixed orbit" style of arc. The rotation of the blade around a fixed center post. They all work. But the advantage of both the McNaughton and the Oneway has to do with Hunter Tools....These brands can be uplifted with a cutter that makes coring so much easier - you will not believe me until you try it. I used one of Hunter's cutters on a Oneway recently. Coring green maple and with a minimum of pressure...and I mean minimum.... I could use one finger to advance the cutter and core out a 14" bowl from the 18" blank....
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2006
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Erie, PA
All of these 3 systems blades have an arc established for each blade. The Woodcut is anchored to the tailstock so that limits the angle where the tool enters the piece. Oneway and McNaughton are controlled by base location and that base location can change the entry point on the wood. By moving the entry point for each arc you can change the outcome of that set arc. I had the smaller Woodcut and could get (with planning) 2 cores for each of the 2 blades but in a set position as it is connected to the fixed tailstock. The other 2 systems can be adjusted for very different entry points which allows for much more versatility and different cuts per blade. It's a shame that Oneway didn't get Chris Ramsey to demonstrate the Oneway system and get it on video to see just how versatile the Oneway is. McNaughton has had Mike Mahoney who makes the system look so easy but I never found it so for me. Having spent a couple of days with Chris Ramsey made my decision to stay with the Oneway a no-brainer. Now with Mike Hunter's Korpro for my Oneway you cannot believe the difference it makes. Yes, the initial cost is high for the Korpro but the difference in the cut makes it so well worth it.
 
Joined
Jul 18, 2018
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Baltimore, MD
But the advantage of both the McNaughton and the Oneway has to do with Hunter Tools....These brands can be uplifted with a cutter that makes coring so much easier - you will not believe me until you try it
Tim, can you explain further? Are you saying the McNaughton can be retrofitted with a different cutter? I’ve got the McNaughton, and it works, but it’s a workout. I’d be interested in a modification that eases the process.
 
Joined
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Tim, can you explain further? Are you saying the McNaughton can be retrofitted with a different cutter? I’ve got the McNaughton, and it works, but it’s a workout. I’d be interested in a modification that eases the process.
Absolutely! Call Mike Hunter @ Hunter Tools. It is about 80 bucks per blade - so I would think of only certain blades to send in.
 
Joined
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The biggest problem with the McNaughton blades is the arc of the curves they have. The last inch or so of each blade goes straight rather than following the perfect arc of the circle. This is why it always drifts to the outside of the kerf as you core. Not much of a problem on smaller cores, up to 10 inch diameter or so, more of a problem on 12 inch cores, and a major pain on 14+ cores. To compensate, you have to open up the kerf.

The other problem is height setting. The system has some flex built into the design. If you set your height by lifting the handle until it is in contact with the top of the tool rest, and the point is on center, you are too low. As soon as the cutting tip engages the wood, it drops considerably. I am always at about 1/4 inch above center so that by the time I get to the bottom of the core I am still very close to center. On deeper cores, I am below center, but have learned to 'feel' when that is happening and will raise the tool rest a little.

Never cared for the Oneway cutting tip. All coring systems are scrapers. Scrapers cut best with a burr. The standard cutter for Oneway is a spear point which 'breaks' the fibers while the sides cut the broken fibers away, and 'helps keep the cutter on course'. Since it is only sharpened on the top surface, you don't get a burr. I had them send me a hardened cutter that didn't have that spear point on it. I ground the sides down to a slight taper, and it hangs off the end of the blade maybe 1/4 inch. It cut far better than their standard cutter. To sharpen it, all you needed to do was to hone the bevel with a coarse diamond hone. They told me it was too aggressive for most turners.

It will be interesting to see what the new Woodcut will look like....

robo hippy
 
Joined
Nov 30, 2019
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Papakura, New Zealand
Robo Hippy is right. There will be a new Woodcut coring tool but no definite timeframe and don't expect anything this year. Still a three-bladed system and, hopefully, a few strength problems overcome.
The Hunter Korpro is shown fitted to a Oneway bowlsaver, not Kelton.
Kelton bowlsavers I have here do not have replacable tips. Kel McNaughton tells me these tools are available from Craft Supplies and Leigh Valley Tools.

Dick Veitch
 
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Mike Hunter did make a carbide tip for one of my McNaughton blades. He probably could do this for the McNaughton blades, but not sure if that is a service he is doing or not. I ended up replacing it with some of the tantung which I use on my Big Ugly tools. Woodcut uses stellite, which is very similar to tantung.

robo hippy
 
Joined
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Mike Hunter did make a carbide tip for one of my McNaughton blades. He probably could do this for the McNaughton blades, but not sure if that is a service he is doing or not. I ended up replacing it with some of the tantung which I use on my Big Ugly tools. Woodcut uses stellite, which is very similar to tantung.

robo hippy
I spoke to Mike about 2 weeks ago....he is doing the McNaughton blades.
 
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
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Robo Hippy is right. There will be a new Woodcut coring tool but no definite timeframe and don't expect anything this year. Still a three-bladed system and, hopefully, a few strength problems overcome.
The Hunter Korpro is shown fitted to a Oneway bowlsaver, not Kelton.
Kelton bowlsavers I have here do not have replacable tips. Kel McNaughton tells me these tools are available from Craft Supplies and Leigh Valley Tools.

Dick Veitch
Sorry Dick, but - call Mike Hunter and he will offer to replace you Kel McNaughton cutter with a replaceable carbide.
 
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
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Penrose, NC
Have not used my McNaughton yet…. tho it is expensive I can tell you that the Hunter up fit on the Oneway is truly unbelievable in how it cuts without any struggle. I was truly shocked at how easy I was coring with it. My thinking is that if you buy one Hunter cartridge and cutter…. You can quickly move it to the next cutter arm size as needed, so that takes the sting out of it. Ther is a lot of machining on that tiny cartridge in order for it to get an exact fit on the Oneway arm. I suppose that is the reason for the cost. But really worth it.
 
Joined
Feb 12, 2018
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Millington, TN
Have not used my McNaughton yet…. tho it is expensive I can tell you that the Hunter up fit on the Oneway is truly unbelievable in how it cuts without any struggle. I was truly shocked at how easy I was coring with it. My thinking is that if you buy one Hunter cartridge and cutter…. You can quickly move it to the next cutter arm size as needed, so that takes the sting out of it. Ther is a lot of machining on that tiny cartridge in order for it to get an exact fit on the Oneway arm. I suppose that is the reason for the cost. But really worth it.
Tim, Is your cutter a recent purchase? In google I see two slightly different types of cartridge designs. One is silver that is more solid across the top, and one is black that is stepped down on the top.

I don’t see how a small part like this cartridge has anywhere near the machining compared to say a chuck sold in this price range. I’m guessing the high price might be more related to limited supply & demand, but that’s Mike’s prerogative since he has this market to himself. Makes me wonder how much the price might drop if there is a group purchase made here?
 
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
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Penrose, NC
Recent Karl. About 2 months ago. Not sure which design I have. But it employs a cupped style carbide cutter that is a sort of diamond shape, so you can turn it around and get more use out of it prior to replacement. I have been told by others using it that it is common to get 40 bowls cored before having to replace the cutter.
As for price - supply and demand? Size of market? No competition?...I can think of several influences. :) But I have no idea if Mike is open to a group buy discount. Might be worth the ask.
 

Bill Boehme

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I don’t see how a small part like this cartridge has anywhere near the machining compared to say a chuck sold in this price range. I’m guessing the high price might be more related to limited supply & demand, but that’s Mike’s prerogative since he has this market to himself

Recovering non-recurring engineering expenses combined with a tiny anticipated market are probably the biggest reasons for the high price. I can envision that the path to the final design involved more than a few iterations.
 

Emiliano Achaval

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I recovered the price with just one core. One of the perks of living in Hawaii and having unlimited Koa to turn. The Korpro cartridge is day and night compared to what the oneway cutter can do. Woodcut is coming out soon with the new and improved Maxsaver 4. Not sure if they are going with 4 or just the new and improved 3. They are making a few changes based on customer feedback.
 
Joined
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Emiliano that is quite a perk and I'm glad for you. Here it takes about 5 or 6 good cores to make up the cost but for me that's only part of the savings. The difference in the cut is just so much easier. For me the Korpro is an engineering marvel. Having had all 3 coring systems in my possession at once and using them it was easy for me to first let the McNaughton go. The Woodcut Bowlsaver is really a good bargain as it fits all your lathes but it is just not as versatile for me as the Oneway. I'm sure that the upgrades to the Bowlsaver 3 will perhaps make it more versatile and there is no doubt that it is a good system (wonder if Mike could do a Korpro upgrade for it :rolleyes: ). In general what it boils down to is I'm into easy. I don't know how many cores I'll eventually get with the Korpro cutter but I'm betting it will even surprise me. It is easier to turn the carbide cutter around than to take off the Oneway cutter and sharpen it and then put it back on. Emiliano you're right when you say day and night.
 

Emiliano Achaval

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Emiliano that is quite a perk and I'm glad for you. Here it takes about 5 or 6 good cores to make up the cost but for me that's only part of the savings. The difference in the cut is just so much easier. For me the Korpro is an engineering marvel. Having had all 3 coring systems in my possession at once and using them it was easy for me to first let the McNaughton go. The Woodcut Bowlsaver is really a good bargain as it fits all your lathes but it is just not as versatile for me as the Oneway. I'm sure that the upgrades to the Bowlsaver 3 will perhaps make it more versatile and there is no doubt that it is a good system (wonder if Mike could do a Korpro upgrade for it :rolleyes: ). In general what it boils down to is I'm into easy. I don't know how many cores I'll eventually get with the Korpro cutter but I'm betting it will even surprise me. It is easier to turn the carbide cutter around than to take off the Oneway cutter and sharpen it and then put it back on. Emiliano you're right when you say day and night.
I still have my old trusty McNaughton, but, like you, I prefer easy. The Korpro is an amazing little cartridge, hard to believe something so small can make such a difference in performance.
 
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I still have my old trusty McNaughton, but, like you, I prefer easy. The Korpro is an amazing little cartridge, hard to believe something so small can make such a difference in performance.
The Korpro is the closest thing to magic I have seen or used for coring. Not that I have anywhere near the experience of you Emiliano - or Bill either :) . When I compare the Oneway carbide to the Korpro in how much "effort" is required to push, and hold on....I literally can gently push the Korpro with ONE finger, without any stress....and it cuts into the wood as if it was butter. Not kidding or exaggerating. Was a little scary the first time I used it, because it was "too easy".
 
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I just spent a bit money getting a Oneway coring system so spending another $190 for that little cartridge is hard to get past the wife. I may be stuck trying to create a cartridge from bar stock unless I come across an unlimited supply of Koa. :)

Figure my first step is finding decent carbide cutters. Someone suggested searching for ccmt21.51 cupped cutter bits. I’d be happy finding using a carbide cutter that only works 90% as good as Mikes if they only cost me $3 to $10 a piece in packs of 10. I should check with Capt’n Eddie if he’s still around since he sold carbide bits at a good price.
 
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Karl -
The only consideration I can think of is - the surface of the cutter arm is ..."corrugated" not flat. If you can create the same corrugations in a homemade cartridge ...it may work. But, getting a good grip on the cutter arm with a carbide cutter - sans cartridge - will be dependent on only the screw thread strength. Sketchy I would think. You may get by with it - if you are very gentle.....I don't know. Just dont screw up your cutter arm in the process.... :) I have a history of spending $5 to save $1. It did not start that way...but in order to fix what I screwed up...it would end up being more expensive than what I thought was "too much for that little thing" kind of thinking.

Oh - and I know there are several KOAs in TN....but they are usually full of campers and tents. I don't know how Emiliano manages to turn them...but I can't argue with his finished work.:D
 
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