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Woodcut Max3 coring

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Feb 12, 2018
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Karl -
The only consideration I can think of is - the surface of the cutter arm is ..."corrugated" not flat. If you can create the same corrugations in a homemade cartridge ...it may work. But, getting a good grip on the cutter arm with a carbide cutter - sans cartridge - will be dependent on only the screw thread strength. Sketchy I would think. You may get by with it - if you are very gentle.....I don't know. Just dont screw up your cutter arm in the process.... :) I have a history of spending $5 to save $1. It did not start that way...but in order to fix what I screwed up...it would end up being more expensive than what I thought was "too much for that little thing" kind of thinking.

Oh - and I know there are several KOAs in TN....but they are usually full of campers and tents. I don't know how Emiliano manages to turn them...but I can't argue with his finished work.:D
My plan is to use a triangle file to grind the ridges on the bottom of my homemade cartridge that match the Oneway arms. I’m also wondering if this might be a good job for one of those mini lathes on Amazon or eBay. Yes, there goes $5 to save $1 dollar, but then I’ll be able to make other fun gadgets with my mechanical engineering son who likes to tinker.

Doesn’t hurt to have Emiliano’s great reputation and location when it comes to pricing. Keeps my hopes up when I hear of other turners doing well in this craft. Would be nice to make some extra spending money woodturning when I retire.
 
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…I had them send me a hardened cutter that didn't have that spear point on it. I ground the sides down to a slight taper, and it hangs off the end of the blade maybe 1/4 inch. It cut far better than their standard cutter. To sharpen it, all you needed to do was to hone the bevel with a coarse diamond hone. They told me it was too aggressive for most turners.
Robo, What does your special hardened cutter from Oneway look like? Do you think it would be possible to grind recess and then drill & tap a hole so it hold a carbide cutter?
 

Emiliano Achaval

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I just spent a bit money getting a Oneway coring system so spending another $190 for that little cartridge is hard to get past the wife. I may be stuck trying to create a cartridge from bar stock unless I come across an unlimited supply of Koa. :)

Figure my first step is finding decent carbide cutters. Someone suggested searching for ccmt21.51 cupped cutter bits. I’d be happy finding using a carbide cutter that only works 90% as good as Mikes if they only cost me $3 to $10 a piece in packs of 10. I should check with Capt’n Eddie if he’s still around since he sold carbide bits at a good price.
I totally understand not wanting to spend the money now after just buying the system. Do not forget that thousands and thousands of turners do not have the Korpro and are happy with the system the way it is.
 

Emiliano Achaval

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My plan is to use a triangle file to grind the ridges on the bottom of my homemade cartridge that match the Oneway arms. I’m also wondering if this might be a good job for one of those mini lathes on Amazon or eBay. Yes, there goes $5 to save $1 dollar, but then I’ll be able to make other fun gadgets with my mechanical engineering son who likes to tinker.

Doesn’t hurt to have Emiliano’s great reputation and location when it comes to pricing. Keeps my hopes up when I hear of other turners doing well in this craft. Would be nice to make some extra spending money woodturning when I retire.
Thank you, Karl. I actually do feel a little guilty when I sell my work. I see some great bowls that sell for $60 on the mainland, even less. Talking about a 12 in salad bowls. You could not even buy the Koa for that to make the bowl. Your work is excellent, you will make money when you retire! My wife tells me it only took 25 plus years of turning but I'm finally making some money, LOL
 
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The cutter is the standard one from Oneway, but without the spear point on it. It does have the grooves on the bottom so it fits the Oneway blades. It came as a rectangle, and I ground a taper on both sides, so now a trapezoid. No clue as to why Oneway doesn't make them this way. Might have to send it to Emiliano to give it a test run. I still like my McNaughton.

robo hippy
 
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Hi all, I'm late to this conversation and I sincerely apologise for that. But of relevance I should disclose that since 2005 this business has been owned by my family.

There are several topics raised in this forum thread, I will attempt to answer and will monitor this forum more closely to answer further. In addition I'm available for contact on dan@woodcut-tools.com or mobile + 64 27 254 6281 (New Zealand).

It is correct that there is no further stock of the Woodcut Bowlsaver Max 3 available for sale in North America. There is however stock of the Woodcut Bowlsaver Max 3 product available in Europe with Neureiter and many other dealers in this region.

We will make an announcement on the availability of further stock of our large bowl coring product in North America in the next month or so. If you are interested and located in the USA please contact Jeff at the Walnut Log or Bradley at Spiracraft who can assist you, or if in Canada please contact the team at Woodchuckers.

I can confirm that our business has tested the Korpro system supplied supplied by our friend Mike Hunter. Currently Woodcut Bowlsaver products are supplied with a Stellite Cutter that can be Hollow Ground to create a fresh burr that we believe is effective for coring a wide range of wood types. To be honest our current view is that because a carbide cutter is unable to raise a burr that the cut will be too aggressive for some customers, as the cutter can grab and pull into the cut. I do note the positive comments for the Hunter Korpro system in this thread which is respected. Our team will therefore test further in consultation with our network of turning friends.

Best wishes everyone, happy turning and keep Covid safe

Dan Hewitt
 
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@Dan Hewitt Thank you for the info! One thing mentioned in this thread you did not address - are you working on a new model or update of the Max3?

It Would be appreciated if your NA Max3 availability announcement could be placed in the forum here (if allowed by our rules?)
 
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Dan, thanks for the update. I have been wanting to add the Woodcut to my arsenal. I do have the old 2 blade system. I have taken my McNaughton system and used tantung for replacing the cutting tips. I consider it to be comparable to the stellite. I did notice how your cutters are concave on the top. While I haven't taken as many cores with yours as I have with the McNaughton, it seemed that the concave cutter did a better job of ejecting the chips and shavings.

If it isn't allowed for you to post that the new set up available or coming soon, all you have to do is tell one of us, and we can post it.

I am not sure about Mike's cutters. If the cutters are slightly cupped on the ends, rather than being flat, they should work well. As near as I can tell, all coring systems operate as scrapers, and in general, scrapers work better with a burr.

robo hippy
 
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I can confirm that our business has tested the Korpro system supplied supplied by our friend Mike Hunter. Currently Woodcut Bowlsaver products are supplied with a Stellite Cutter that can be Hollow Ground to create a fresh burr that we believe is effective for coring a wide range of wood types. To be honest our current view is that because a carbide cutter is unable to raise a burr that the cut will be too aggressive for some customers, as the cutter can grab and pull into the cut. I do note the positive comments for the Hunter Korpro system in this thread which is respected. Our team will therefore test further in consultation with our network of turning friends.
Dan, Would this lessen some of the concerns with aggressiveness if the cupped carbide bit is mounted at a downward angle?
 
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Dan, Would this lessen some of the concerns with aggressiveness if the cupped carbide bit is mounted at a downward angle?
Hi Karl, yes our business has designed a 13 mm Carbide Cup Cutter tool also known as the Little Wonder Tool designed for finishing, end grain projects, goblets, bowls, boxes & vases, to your point this product features a 13mm cupped carbide cutter mounted on a downward angle. We also offer a 13mm M2 HSS cup cutter option which is far more popular than the carbide cutter, especially in Europe. https://www.woodcut-tools.com/store/p29/Little_Wonder_Tool.html

In terms of bowl coring cutters, our approach is to mount the cutter flat, if not slightly down.
 
Joined
Sep 15, 2021
Messages
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Location
Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
Dan, thanks for the update. I have been wanting to add the Woodcut to my arsenal. I do have the old 2 blade system. I have taken my McNaughton system and used tantung for replacing the cutting tips. I consider it to be comparable to the stellite. I did notice how your cutters are concave on the top. While I haven't taken as many cores with yours as I have with the McNaughton, it seemed that the concave cutter did a better job of ejecting the chips and shavings.

If it isn't allowed for you to post that the new set up available or coming soon, all you have to do is tell one of us, and we can post it.

I am not sure about Mike's cutters. If the cutters are slightly cupped on the ends, rather than being flat, they should work well. As near as I can tell, all coring systems operate as scrapers, and in general, scrapers work better with a burr.

robo hippy
Hi Robo, thank you for sharing your comments, all noted. On the topic of shavings you maybe interested in the attached photo taken in the last few days on our test lathe, the thick shavings on the left are from the Woodcut Bowlsaver stellite cutter and the smaller shavings from the left are from another 'very popular' bowl coring product 20210908_151020 (1).jpg
 
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My first thought on the wide shavings is that is a very big cutter for hanging more than a few inches off of the tool rest. Smaller shavings from the McNaughton most likely. When the blades are new with that spear point, which I grind down to square, the shavings tend to fold in the middle. When ground square, rather than spear pointed, those shavings resemble what I get.

robo hippy
 
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