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What’s on your lathe?

Joined
Jan 12, 2014
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Location
Crossville, TN
The symposium this past weekend was great, but I was definitely pining to get back on the lathe. Working on a fairly small, very curly Pecan calabash for a friend. I rough turned this quite a while ago and am now finish turning. Pecan is quite hard, and kind of a pain to sand, but when all said and done it is beautiful. Will finish with Danish oil and then will try a topcoat of varnish oil for the first time.

View attachment 63785
Just finished a small pecan hollow form, my first in pecan. Looked great but when I applied the oil I noticed fine scathes. Is this what you mean by difficult and what do you do different for the pecan? Thanks
 

Michael Anderson

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Just finished a small pecan hollow form, my first in pecan. Looked great but when I applied the oil I noticed fine scathes. Is this what you mean by difficult and what do you do different for the pecan? Thanks
Hi Ted. You're spot on with what I mean about it being difficult--scratches show up in a very obvious way, especially when you have a darker piece. Despite Pecan being semi-porous, it is still fairly tight and fine grain. Yet, it is still prone to tearout and splitting. I tend to treat it like a hard exotic wood, and usually sand to at least 600g and then rub/burnish on and off the lathe with gray scrotchbrite. Off the lathe rubbing, I'll try to follow the grain as well as move randomly. This seems to take care of the fine sanding marks. Between coats of oil, I will rub repeat the same hand rubbing process. Note, there is a lot of variety in Pecan. Lighter, faster growing trees tend to be a bit more forgiving. The wood in my photo came from the lower trunk heartwood of a fairly slow-growing, very old tree. Hope that helps!
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2014
Messages
75
Likes
292
Location
Crossville, TN
Hi Ted. You're spot on with what I mean about it being difficult--scratches show up in a very obvious way, especially when you have a darker piece. Despite Pecan being semi-porous, it is still fairly tight and fine grain. Yet, it is still prone to tearout and splitting. I tend to treat it like a hard exotic wood, and usually sand to at least 600g and then rub/burnish on and off the lathe with gray scrotchbrite. Off the lathe rubbing, I'll try to follow the grain as well as move randomly. This seems to take care of the fine sanding marks. Between coats of oil, I will rub repeat the same hand rubbing process. Note, there is a lot of variety in Pecan. Lighter, faster growing trees tend to be a bit more forgiving. The wood in my photo came from the lower trunk heartwood of a fairly slow-growing, very old tree. Hope that helps!
Thanks Michael, very helpful.
 

odie

TOTW Team
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Dec 22, 2006
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Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
I just wasn't happy with the quality of the grooves on the top of this Amboyna burl bowl. Although, it stuck out like a sore thumb every time I looked at it, I kept thinking nobody would notice the flaw, but that saying, "If you think it's good enough, it probably isn't" kept bugging me......so, I put it back on the lathe last night and re-did the top surface. I was afraid I'd ruin a very expensive piece of wood.....but, all turned out well!

Before pic: --------------------------------------------------- After pic:
1717074483421.png 20240529_224917.jpg

-o-
 
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odie

TOTW Team
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Dec 22, 2006
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Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Finished up an Australian Red River Gum burl bowl last night, too.

Man, this wood really tears up your sandpaper and discs! :(

-o-

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Joined
Apr 30, 2022
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Beavercreek, OH
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www.ovwg.org
I just wasn't happy with the quality of the grooves on the top of this Amboyna burl bowl. Although, it stuck out like a sore thumb every time I looked at it, I kept thinking nobody would notice the flaw, but that saying, "If you think it's good enough, it probably isn't" kept bugging me......so, I put it back on the lathe last night and re-did the top surface. I was afraid I'd ruin a very expensive piece of wood.....but, all turned out well!

Before pic: --------------------------------------------------- After pic:
View attachment 63813 View attachment 63814

-o-
Much better Odie, I think there were too many lines and it was detracting from the figure and color on the rim....
 
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
43
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369
Location
West Linn, Oregon
Website
www.instagram.com
I just finished hollowing a piece of Monkeypod (suar) with some nice spalting and a very cool bark inclusion. Still pondering the finish because the other side has a lot of gray stain. I may try a wash of wood dye to blend it without obscuring the spalting.
 

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Joined
Feb 6, 2010
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Location
Brandon, MS
Urn progression is speeding up. Hollowed it yesterday and today got the embellishments done. Carved the upper and used a burr to burn in the lower pattern. IMG_9054.jpegIMG_9055.jpeg

Then dyed black and dry brushed two shades of blue. Dimples got a dry brush of Pearl white.
 
Joined
Aug 14, 2022
Messages
40
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124
Location
Atascadero, CA
Paper Birch from a former club member whose trees died in the last drought and he donated the wood to the club. Had some spalting, but it looks better on a few pieces that I have not gotten around to turning yet. Natural edge on the rim although the bark fell off while drying. The spout feature was nature doing its thing.
Jay

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Joined
Sep 19, 2023
Messages
571
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1,104
Location
Columbia, TN
Small Cherry bowl from part of a crotch. The sapwood side was rotted/spalted but it made for an interesting look. Yorkshire grit followed by Myland's.
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My LaserPecker does this to me once in a while. Despite my sending it a new image, and that new image showing up correctly in the app, it sometimes uses the previous image I uploaded. This burning is sort of deep so I really don't want to sand off the logo and re-burn it.
IMG_20240605_152648.jpg
 
Joined
Aug 16, 2022
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Location
Butler, PA
Cheese & cracker plate with cheese knife and cheese fork. Going to make two more, this one was practice since it had a crack. Had to hand inlet the pewa since the router and template wouldn't fit into the curve. Filled the knot voids with epoxy and coffee grounds.
 

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