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Show us your tool rack/cart

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Bob, are those hockey pucks for shock absorption? I would expect them to be hard enough to take shock without being squishy. Can't remember, but think I have heard of doing that before....

robo hippy
 
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Seeing all the super organized ways people store tools make me feel like a slacker. For tools I’m not using on my current project I store them in the drawers of my old tool box/sharpening cart.
7CBA818A-6C8D-49A0-B46C-11D937511479.jpeg
My laziness is that for tools I am using I put them point down into a five gallon bucket of dry shavings I keep by the lathe. The shavings keep them upright for easy grabbing and also protects the edges from getting nicked (as well as me getting nicked by the edges)
84EA7295-952F-4B5B-8A78-962471CE2759.jpeg
 
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Bob, are those hockey pucks for shock absorption? I would expect them to be hard enough to take shock without being squishy. Can't remember, but think I have heard of doing that before....

robo hippy
Yes, they are hockey pucks. I don’t like the metal legs on concrete so the pucks work nicely. They can be trimmed flush to the metal legs but I like the larger footprint for more stability (arguable but that’s my rationale for not trimming). There is no wiggle... the pucks are quite hard. It’s much easier to pick up and move or lightly drag a machine and not worry about scraping metal on concrete.F934E0FC-B1BB-4EB0-A96B-ABF4C4AC25FF.png
 
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I've been rationalising (UK english meaning) my bowl turning tool arrangement in more recent years. The aim is to not have to step away from the lathe other than to re-sharpen. I prefer that to be one step away to separate the shavings from the sparks.

I'm down to just two tool zones. The bowl gouges...

Gouges.jpg
And, the 'in use' zone, which is a re-purposed serving tray with the stem of an old office chair attached to the bottom. The stem is the same diameter as my tool post and the tray fits in either my inboard or outboard banjo, depending where I'm turning. 99% of the time I'm turning outboard, so the tray is mostly on the inboard banjo. The banjos can be maneuvered to get the tools into just the right position for reach...


Tool tray.jpg

Tool tray for outboard turning.JPG Tool tray for inboard turning.JPG
As you can see, I'm post 'pretty workshops', or clean, for that matter...:)

PS - Those last two photos were taken some time ago and very few of the tools shown there still have dedicated handles attached.
 
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odie

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I've been rationalising (UK english meaning) my bowl turning tool arrangement in more recent years. The aim is to not have to step away from the lathe other than to re-sharpen. I prefer that to be one step away to separate the shavings from the sparks.

I'm down to just two tool zones. The bowl gouges...

And, the 'in use' zone, which is a re-purposed serving tray with the stem of an old office chair attached to the bottom. The stem is the same diameter as my tool post and the tray fits in either my inboard or outboard banjo, depending where I'm turning. 99% of the time I'm turning outboard, so the tray is mostly on the inboard banjo. The banjos can be maneuvered to get the tools into just the right position for reach...


As you can see, I'm post 'pretty workshops', or clean, for that matter...:)

PS - Those last two photos were taken some time ago and very few of the tools shown there still have dedicated handles attached.

Good thinking, Neil.....

For myself, I have four places to hold lathe tools.

New lathe tools storage
Tools infrequently used
Tools frequently used
Tools currently in use

The concept of everything organized and within easy reach, goes well beyond just lathe tools. As with you, my shop is in a constant state of change. It takes effort to keep everything up to date, but well worth it.

-----odie-----
 
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Robo, it looks to be a Woodfast out of Australia. It appears to be their model WL520B.


I don't think they are sold directly in the USA. But I also found this web site:


Be a lot of belt changes for me.
 

odie

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Be a lot of belt changes for me.

The 120-900 belt range would be about perfect for my bowl turning.....and, I see it has 1 1/4 x 8 spindle.

The Woodfast WL520A is interesting, but only available in metric spindle threads.

These lathes don't list the weight......a very important consideration for bowl turners.

Someday, one of the premium lathe manufacturers will target the American market with all the features Americans want in a swivel head lathe.

Note: I actually contacted Brent English @Brent@TurnRobust once, and offered up-front money to build a prototype of his Sweet 16 lathe with a swivel head. Unfortunately, he wasn't interested.....but, that would have been my dream lathe, if he had gone for it!

Swivel head lathes are becoming popular on the international market......for good reason. The concept is perfect for bowl turning. IMHO, much better than a sliding headstock, where it would involve repositioning the turner, and all his equipment.

-----odie-----

 
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hockenbery

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Swivel head lathes are becoming popular on the international market......for good reason. The concept is perfect for bowl turning. IMHO, much better than a sliding headstock, where it would involve repositioning the turner, and all his equipment.
So true and it is probably faster than using an outboard.
Keeps the same footprint.

Using an outboard is not as much repositioning and generally a lot less set up than a sliding headstock.
Out board will increase the footprint.
 
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The prime reason I do not think wisfully about an AB or Oneway lathe . Maybe a pivot HS Vicmarc someday. I use the pivot feature of my Nova Galaxi in many different ways. Going to a sliding HS would be a significant downgrade for me. There are no belt changes, but a slower min speed (100rpm) would be nice for sanding.
 

odie

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The prime reason I do not think wisfully about an AB or Oneway lathe . Maybe a pivot HS Vicmarc someday. I use the pivot feature of my Nova Galaxi in many different ways. Going to a sliding HS would be a significant downgrade for me. There are no belt changes, but a slower min speed (100rpm) would be nice for sanding.

Doug.....You know from experience, the reasons why a swivel headstock is so applicable to the needs of many woodturners. I have given some thought to the Vicmarc 240 lathe, but the only domestic supplier who offered it has gone out of business. I don't care for the 30mm tool post diameter and having to use a sleeve for all my tool rests. It was offered in 1 1/4 x 8 threads, and that is great. I really like that the V240 is around 650 lbs, which is about 170 lbs heavier than the Sweet 16.....

-----odie-----
 
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odie,
You can still get a VL240 from Ken Rude at Branches to Bowls in Alberta, Canada. As far as the 30mm tool post is concerned with the stock 12" tool rest, it's rock solid and my favorite rest to use by far. He also sells a 18" offset tool rest that's 8" to the left and 10" to the right that comes in handy when using the swivel head. For bowl work, I don't see the need for anything else. The swivel headstock is a game changer for me and exceeded my expectations in every way.
 

odie

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odie,
You can still get a VL240 from Ken Rude at Branches to Bowls in Alberta, Canada. As far as the 30mm tool post is concerned with the stock 12" tool rest, it's rock solid and my favorite rest to use by far. He also sells a 18" offset tool rest that's 8" to the left and 10" to the right that comes in handy when using the swivel head. For bowl work, I don't see the need for anything else. The swivel headstock is a game changer for me and exceeded my expectations in every way.

Thank you for this information, Dave.

Question about the banjo. It looks like it's a straight grub screw holding the tool rest in place.....is this so? If so, if I ever did get a VL240, I'd probably get a banjo from another supplier. I sure am spoiled with the Sweet 16 Robust banjo I'm using now. The original Woodfast banjo had a straight grub screw holding the tool rest, and I'd want to avoid those problems I had with it.

One thing about it, I really do like that the VL240 is 650 lbs......weight is extremely important to my style of turning.

-----odie-----
 
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yes it is a straight screw, 12mm with a nice long handle that actually fits in your hand for good leverage.
 
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Neil, what kind of lathe is that? Don't think I have seen that one before. Pivoting headstock?

robo hippy

Yes, pivoting headstock that was designed here in Adelaide by the original Woodfast crew and the components, other than the electronics, manufactured in China. The yellow colour indicates it was assembled back here by Woodfast and they designated it as the Woodfast C1000X. It is a lathe that has been re-badged by other distributors using other colours, like the WL520B. The equivalent in Vicmarc was the now discontinued VL175... another very good medium powered lathe other than its outboard turning rig arrangement, IMO.

Mine came with the outboard turning rig, which is where I do most most of my turning. I have been using those Woodfast outboard turning rigs for over 50yrs and yet to find a better outboard arrangement. With the outboard rig attached to my C1000x weighs about 500lbs, so a good weight for me for bowl turning with the headstock swivelled in that orientation (the bed acts as a counterweight to dampen any vibrations). I also like the min speed of 20rpm for some work, but it does only come with 1.5hp, which is a fraction under powered for larger diameter coring, but otherwise it is is just about right for my purposes. The other option for me would be to go up to the Vicmarc VL240, but (like the VL175) I don't like its outboard turning rig anywhere near as much.

And, I missed this other bit of storage 'at the lathe'. This is this my very sophisticated arrangement held on top of the headstock with magnets...

IMG_20220719_154506.jpg
 

odie

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@Neil S

I have one of the original Woodfast lathes, and I see a difference in the headstocks of my older Woodfast compared to your newer one. This may not make much difference to some turners, but it's a major difference to me, or anyone else who is primarily a "faceplate" bowl turner. The newer lathe has a straight across flat frontal surface, pretty much like the old Powermatic 3520B. This severely limits access to the exterior of bowls mounted to a faceplate. My original Woodfast headstock at least has some taper to it, and on top of that, I've found it necessary to grind away some additional cast iron on the corner, and lip of the top cover. Woodfast would have done well to have taken a hint from some more recent lathes, such as the Robust AB with the recessed headstock, and Powermatic 3520C with the spindle and bearings extended away from the headstock. For turners who turn bowls using chucks, this may not be such a big deal, but it's a very big deal for me....

-----odie-----
 

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I wish I had the space you guys have! I work in an area 8 x 6’. The 4 gouges most likely to be used for the job are to the right of the lathe. The rest are clipped to the mini bandsaw bench using the clips that hold kitchen kickboards to the unit legs! The grinder is directly behind where I stand. Shelves hold blanks, chucks: small drawers the rest!image.jpg
 
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I also talked to Brent about the need for a good American made pivoting head lathe, and he was not interested. I do prefer the banjo from Robust to any others I have ever used. If I was younger, I would design and make my own pivoting headstock lathe. Too many other irons in the fire now.... Trying to learn how to use hand planes and then on to Japanese joinery...... More tools too....

robo hippy
 
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Mastering the hand plane is fairly easy - It is about 95% sharpening and 5% understanding the set-up. Once you have a keenly sharp blade (as in sharper than a disposable razor blade) you can set up the plane to take shavings thinner than a human hair.... My biggest struggle was mastering the sharpening of the blade (Once you think you have it sharp, sharpen it some more) but once you have a properly sharp blade (take a .0005" thick shaving from end grain pine that you can uncurl and lay flat) you'll know from the feel (and for those with good hearing, the sound) of the plane as you use it when it is time to re-sharpen.
 
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I have one of the original Woodfast lathes, and I see a difference in the headstocks of my older Woodfast compared to your newer one. This may not make much difference to some turners, but it's a major difference to me, or anyone else who is primarily a "faceplate" bowl turner. T

-----odie-----

Odie

I use a spindle extensions (like a very long chuck insert) if ever I feel in need of more working room, which I occasionally do when remounting a very deep pre-turned bowl for returning the outside. That also gives me better access to tighten the chuck inside the bowl.

I can see that you can buy them in the US...


And, any good engineering shop can make one for you that doesn't have any run-out

The Vicmarc VL240, Laguna and Nova DVR have more protruding noses at the spindle, but I find the spindle extension gives even better access and a cheaper option than buying another lathe that doesn't do the other things that I prefer...:)
 

odie

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Odie

I use a spindle extensions (like a very long chuck insert) if ever I feel in need of more working room, which I occasionally do when remounting a very deep pre-turned bowl for returning the outside. That also gives me better access to tighten the chuck inside the bowl.

I can see that you can buy them in the US...


And, any good engineering shop can make one for you that doesn't have any run-out

The Vicmarc VL240, Laguna and Nova DVR have more protruding noses at the spindle, but I find the spindle extension gives even better access and a cheaper option than buying another lathe that doesn't do the other things that I prefer...:)

Hi Neil......

The problem with spindle extensions, is any out of balance condition is exacerbated the further away from the spindle bearings it gets. For my purposes, the best solution is at the engineering level of the headstock, where tool access can be a priority. The tapered frontal section of the original Woodfast lathe took this into consideration, and although it's not bad, it could be improved upon. Regardless, it has better tool access than your current Woodfast lathe.

I can't think of a better solution than that of the Robust American Beauty headstock. See how it's designed to take tool access into consideration:

-----odie-----

1658380985209.png
 
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I use std Avery round dot labels, 3/4” dia I think. I use an avery Word template for the specific label #. I made up what goes on the labels, ie 5/8 BG. I use white letters with the circle background colored. I change background color for a different grind, 5/8 BG Ellsworth is a different color than a 5/8 BG 40/40 grind. I made up various id’s for scraper type. Printed with a std ink jet printer. Could be hand written over a magic marker colored background, use light colors and a black marker for writing.

The end of handles are cut off to 3/4-1” dia hi
The tubes are sized so the ferrule fits and the front handle bulge stops it. I cut pvc union fittings in 1/2, use a 1/2 at each end of the pipe. The top end pipe/union is routered with a radius bit.

I make a box, router a rabbet to hold ~1/8” ply which is hole sawed for each tube. A “tube guide” ply layer goes in the top and bottom of the box. Box is fully assembled, then the tubes inserted. There are simpler ways to do it.
Thanks, Doug. I've (nearly) finished the tool stand, and I think I'll do something very similar to what you suggest to label everything. I might even try laser-engraving labels onto coloured counters. I rather think that if I do, it will work ok for the first and second ones, then I'll decide it's far too slow, and go back to marker pens. We'll see, but thanks for your really helpful description.
 
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I can't think of a better solution than that of the Robust American Beauty headstock. See how it's designed to take tool access into consideration:


Odie, I have no doubt that the Robust AB is a solution for many things, but not here. It is unlikely that we will ever see one down here. I had a conversation with Brent English a few years ago about Robust lathes in Australia and we agreed that it was not going to happen. So, we will just have to do with our local Woodfasts, Vicmarcs, Stuby and NZ Novas down here...:)
 
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Roger Wiegand

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One thing about it, I really do like that the VL240 is 650 lbs......weight is extremely important to my style of turning.

-----odie-----
With eight half inch anchor bolts going into a concrete slab I'm thinking my lathe weighs roughly 6 X 10^24 kg (the weight of the earth). It doesn't move much!
 

odie

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With eight half inch anchor bolts going into a concrete slab I'm thinking my lathe weighs roughly 6 X 10^24 kg (the weight of the earth). It doesn't move much!

Anchoring the lathe to a cement slab is always a good idea.....mine is, as well. However, when it comes to addressing harmonic vibration issues, weight closer to the source of the vibration is the better solution.

-----odie-----
 
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Sharpening the plane irons has been the easy part for me. At present, I use the Veritas jig, which takes the guess work out of it. DMT makes lapping plates up to 8000 grit. Some of their diamond paste on a strop, and I get a 15000 grit edge. I can get a glass smooth surface. Just having to learn new hand skills..... Now, on to hand cut dove tails!

robo hippy
 

odie

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I finally made a new tool holder because I got so tired of piles of my tools on my table. My old wooden tool holder was not large enough so I built these. Nothing new but a sound method.

Howdy Breck...... :)

My tool edges are all pointing up, but looks like you've devised a way to put them facing down, and still visible....good job.

-----odie-----
 

Tom Gall

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I finally took a few pics of my tool racks/holders. Not as pretty as some but very functional and easy to use.
Benefits: Sharp edges are down. You don't have to find a hole with the tool tip. You don't have to get the tool in the same plane as the PVC tube to drop it in. Just hold the tool by the handle above the ferrule - slide the tool shaft into the angled opening - drop the tool so the ferrule or wood handle bulge drops into the hole. You can adjust hole sizes and openings for different size tools and handles. Quick and easy.

Also, a magnetic tool holder (for tools being used) to mount anywhere on the lathe bed. PVC pipe cut in half, hot melt glued together and screwed to a piece of plywood and magnetic base.

1- Tool Racks -2 P1070278 2.jpgWWW2- P1070279 2.jpgWWW3- P1070280 2.jpg


A- Magnetic Holder - on Lathe Bed - P1070284 2.jpgWWWB- Magnetic Bottom- P1070286 2.jpgWWWC- Magnetic Tool Holder - P1070283 2.jpg
 
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I finally took a few pics of my tool racks/holders. Not as pretty as some but very functional and easy to use.
Benefits: Sharp edges are down. You don't have to find a hole with the tool tip. You don't have to get the tool in the same plane as the PVC tube to drop it in. Just hold the tool by the handle above the ferrule - slide the tool shaft into the angled opening - drop the tool so the ferrule or wood handle bulge drops into the hole. You can adjust hole sizes and openings for different size tools and handles. Quick and easy.

Also, a magnetic tool holder (for tools being used) to mount anywhere on the lathe bed. PVC pipe cut in half, hot melt glued together and screwed to a piece of plywood and magnetic base.

View attachment 45761WWWView attachment 45762WWWView attachment 45763


View attachment 45764WWWView attachment 45765WWWView attachment 45766
That split plastic-tube idea is a bloody genius, Tom. I'm definitely going to use that too!
 
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This is not an original plan or idea from me, but I'm not sure where I saw this originally.

This has served 2 purposes.
  1. I can move the cart where I want or need it while using it or getting it out of the way.
  2. The larger purpose is that it is a project that I got to build with my dad. Something that I will have forever with his modifications and tweaks all over it.

tubCRSOT6MbdzXPaZEWalFe1wM2F2o7fxGvGgMyqnOQRgsUVR5a8zRkNgabS89yjNe_xsk19cIzAFF1jl3Rm1ax-U71zHvCH7nktCxbTlJYr3usXAES9xcdeVRcHA48qqEbSEda0t9n7shQh7PuuP_M


plOn4EIrLqyaCwaoVkPD9hbT6V5x7ZBqSM8mT8al4oCodia5zjm2Z0ZwkWZerkQLuj42jDglmaXBfLDD2ty-ux1ril0SuwWXslkmM45baUXgXAqY4phdBOCPUBfkIy0QgraLMmUNhqgjMztwOBfnpbE
 
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Doug,

Yikes - lots of replies. Mine may be a bit different from the others in that in intend to follow my circuitous route to a final solution that I like.

I have had a lathe for more than 50 years. And more tool storage solutions than I can count. In the end I decided that I was not happy with any solution that required me to lift the tool UP out of a hole, slot or cage. I also found I was not happy with any solution that hid the tool tips. I gotta be able to see the tip to know which tool I'm about to grab. And, I have too many tools so I needed a solution that allowed me to have 30-40 tools pretty much available on demand.

I thought I had a picture of what my lathe area looked like yesterday. Can't find it. Last night I started the rework of the whole area. The tool racks won't change design although I have moved them around. Maybe when I'm done I'll remember to post a picture of the new arrangement. My bottom line is that there are a lot more tools than just the actual gouges and scrapers. I find that I enjoy my turning much more and for whatever difference it makes to an old retired guy, I am a lot more productive in a well arranged area. So my rework will also change the way I store chucks and faceplates, keys, centers and commonly used allen wrenches, chucks wrenches, forstner bits, blah, blah, blah.

Bottom line is that tool storage method that had finally worked for me is high visibility, straight pull access, tool tips visible and accommodation for very long tools)I have a couple with 24" handles and they just don't fit lots of other solutions.

Hopefully you've got it all worked out now and this is just too little and too late.

LatheTools.jpg

Tom
 
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Doug,

Yikes - lots of replies. Mine may be a bit different from the others in that in intend to follow my circuitous route to a final solution that I like.

I have had a lathe for more than 50 years. And more tool storage solutions than I can count. In the end I decided that I was not happy with any solution that required me to lift the tool UP out of a hole, slot or cage. I also found I was not happy with any solution that hid the tool tips. I gotta be able to see the tip to know which tool I'm about to grab. And, I have too many tools so I needed a solution that allowed me to have 30-40 tools pretty much available on demand.

I thought I had a picture of what my lathe area looked like yesterday. Can't find it. Last night I started the rework of the whole area. The tool racks won't change design although I have moved them around. Maybe when I'm done I'll remember to post a picture of the new arrangement. My bottom line is that there are a lot more tools than just the actual gouges and scrapers. I find that I enjoy my turning much more and for whatever difference it makes to an old retired guy, I am a lot more productive in a well arranged area. So my rework will also change the way I store chucks and faceplates, keys, centers and commonly used allen wrenches, chucks wrenches, forstner bits, blah, blah, blah.

Bottom line is that tool storage method that had finally worked for me is high visibility, straight pull access, tool tips visible and accommodation for very long tools)I have a couple with 24" handles and they just don't fit lots of other solutions.

Hopefully you've got it all worked out now and this is just too little and too late.

View attachment 45787

Tom
Simple but brilliant. I may steal this. I'm thinking a lazy susan with tools mounted around the perimeter. This has been a great thread for fostering ideas.
Pat
 
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Doug.....You know from experience, the reasons why a swivel headstock is so applicable to the needs of many woodturners. I have given some thought to the Vicmarc 240 lathe, but the only domestic supplier who offered it has gone out of business. I don't care for the 30mm tool post diameter and having to use a sleeve for all my tool rests. It was offered in 1 1/4 x 8 threads, and that is great. I really like that the V240 is around 650 lbs, which is about 170 lbs heavier than the Sweet 16.....

-----odie-----
Odie, It very popular here, it comes out in several configuration including a bench model that is quite compact. It seemed to bridge a gap in the market and it took off and became a very popular bowl lathe. But the 30mm toolpost would be a hassle for me as well.
 
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Tool rack hmm, as my space is small the options are limited, so limited that both my bench and grinder are on wheels :) So mine are mounted on the wall with 50mm PVC pipe and the noggin
 

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Location
Clinton Corners, NY
I just finished mocking up the first of my tool storage racks for the extended shop I am building, and I am very pleased w it. This one is just scrapers and chucks, but I will make others for everything else. It will hang on a french cleat wall for the moment until I finalize the arrangement of the shop after using it for a while. The Magnet strip holds beautifully, and the whole unit is tipped back 12 degrees .IMG_4817.jpeg
 
Joined
Feb 16, 2012
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Location
Sebastopol, California
I dithered about making a custom tool rack for a long time, but it was a constantly-moving target. I'd get new tools, or change my patterns of work, and whatever design I had settled on was no longer appropriate. Also, wall space is very scarce in my shop (I have loads of shelves and lumber racks all the way around), so a freestanding rack made more sense. Rather than put a lot of effort into making something that would be perfect just until the next tool or work-pattern change came along, I quickly whomped together a couple of milk crates, a scrap of melamine and some old casters with zip ties and screws, and it has turned out to be a superb tool station. The tool tips slip down through the grating on the top which keeps the sharp stuff away from my fingers, and the smallest triangular holes in the grating hold tiny tools like scissors, tweezers and glue pipettes. I can group my tools by function, with the most-used tools at the front and left. Currently it's bowl gouges along the left side, small scrapers at the front, spindle tools along the right edge, hollowing tools and the walloping huge scrapers at the back, and miscellaneous in the middle. I've hung a few items on the outside as well (mallets and calipers and the like) since it's easy to attach wire loops to the crate grating. The grating also makes it easy for chips and dust to either fall through or get blown out.
I no longer keep chucks in the shelf below the tools, since that space is full of pointy tool ends and I need to get at my chucks all the time. That space is now occupied by leather and rubber pads for different kinds of chucking, plus odds and ends I don't need to get into very often, and the chucks are on the lumber rack shelf immediately behind me as I work at the lathe. The bottom shelf is for the drill I use for power sanding, some templates, my Beall Buffer kit box and a few other odds and ends.
This whole assembly can roll, so if I'm turning down at the far end of the bed I can just trundle the whole mess down there. Normally it lives tucked into a little space between my headstock and the wall.
I don't like storing my regular turning tools on magnetized surfaces since they get magnetized themselves and will stick unpleasantly to my tool rest.
My system was essentially free (My favorite! It helps that I had some old casters in the shop.), took about 20 minutes to put together, and has proved remarkably versatile and flexible.

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Joined
Feb 7, 2023
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Location
Gardner, MA
I had some left over stock in the wood rack so I threw this together for now. Might add wheels for more easy cleanup. Might change it if I start doing more and getting more equipment. Need to update my pic as I have already added more stuff and modified it some.
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