• December Turning Challenge Winner!
    Congratulations to Wilson Andrews, the winner of the December Turning Challenge, theme: Happy New Year!
    CLICK HERE to see the voting results.
  • January Turning Challenge -- Turn a French Rolling Pin!!

    Click HERE for further details.
  • Turning of the Week --January 17, 2022

    Congratulations to Andy Goldman for "Latest Charity Donation Bowl" being selected as this weeks TOTW! CLICK HERE for full details.

  • Welcome new registering member. Your username must be your real First and Last name (for example: John Doe). "Screen names" and "handles" are not allowed and your registration will be deleted if you don't use your real name. Also, do not use all caps nor all lower case.

Show us your tool rack/cart

Joined
May 11, 2011
Messages
66
Likes
89
Location
Abbotsford B.C.
Panels are spalted Birch, rails and stiles are alder. Cabinet box was made from 5/8” 13 ply mahogany faced marine plywood. All my shop walls, ceiling and cabinets were done in this plywood.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
I love seeing other turner's shops, especially those that look well used..... :D

I took these photos yesterday.......the shop is always a "work in progress", so I thought I'd update.:)
IMG_4274.JPG IMG_4275.JPG IMG_4276.JPG IMG_4277.JPG IMG_4278.JPG
-----odie-----
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Pretty clean looking shop, odie and you claim to be a busy woodturner??? The place looks like it hasn't been "in use" since before the last licence plate posting on the wall!! HA! HA!

:D-----odie-----:D
 
Joined
Jun 29, 2017
Messages
799
Likes
558
Location
Jasper, Alabama
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
I'm not sure that Odie does any turning. I think that he just makes shop jigs. :D And collects license plates. :D
(We really really need a laughing emotee! :D)
Now Odie that is what I call organized!! :D

You know, Lamar......there has been a million times I've told myself "now, I've got everything just the way I want it"......only to change things around......again, and again! :eek:

I think some people have a natural instinct to resist modifying tools and tooling. Admittedly, sometimes I screw things up that way.......but, the successes are absolutely worth the aggravation of the occasional SNAFU!.......:oops:

-----odie-----
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
2,138
Likes
1,000
Location
Brandon, MS
(We really really need a laughing emotee! :D)


You know, Lamar......there has been a million times I've told myself "now, I've got everything just the way I want it"......only to change things around......again, and again! :eek:

I think some people have a natural instinct to resist modifying tools and tooling. Admittedly, sometimes I screw things up that way.......but, the successes are absolutely worth the aggravation of the occasional SNAFU!.......:oops:

-----odie-----
meeee tooooooo You do not learn if u do not try
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2011
Messages
251
Likes
99
Location
Delray Beach, FL
I have done it "that way", and its not as much fan as trying a "different way" so do it the different way, you will learn something new. Even if it doesn't work you will learn.

It's more fun that way.

Stu
 
Joined
Jul 26, 2016
Messages
2,088
Likes
943
Location
Nebraska
Bobby,
With that model of lathe you can cut a piece of plywood and position between the lathe legs which can provide a platform to lay sandbags which will be needed when turning larger pieces or you can bolt the lathe to the floor.
 
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
242
Likes
125
Location
Midland, TX
Bobby,
With that model of lathe you can cut a piece of plywood and position between the lathe legs which can provide a platform to lay sandbags which will be needed when turning larger pieces or you can bolt the lathe to the floor.
Thanks for the idea Mike!. It's not in this picture, but I made a toolbox later to hold my chucks, etc.... It sits on the second shelf and goes from one end to the other. That puts a bit more weight on the lathe right now. With what I'm doing on it, I don't get any movement or vibration yet. If/when I get good enough to advance to large items, I will probably looking at ways to secure the lathe better. Thanks again!
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2012
Messages
104
Likes
32
Location
Cuero, Texas
Was just revisiting this and discovered that since I'd posted what I was using, a serious upgrade has occurred.
On one of our shopping trips to Sam's I saw a nice table with drawers that would make a good base for what I wanted. So, with some bracket, spring clamps, and magnetic bars--it happened! (Didn't realize I'd accumulated so many tools--please don't tell the Mrs.)
IMG_1324.JPG IMG_1325.JPG IMG_1326.JPG IMG_1328.JPG
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
@Bobby Smith .....I'll bet half the people who posted in this thread, have made changes to their tool racks since posting here. It's just the way things are, if we intend to keep our shops up-to-date with the times. "Retrofit" is a word that should be a part of a turner's vocabulary......that is.....If he believes in the concept of "improving thyself".....! :D

When I ditched my old Woodfast banjo, and replaced it with a Robust banjo (a very important upgrade, IMHO), that required a re-do of the special tools I keep handy on, and near my bedway tool shelf. Life goes on, and we MUST adapt to a new, and changing shop environment! :eek:

-----odie-----
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
@Bobby Smith......I just played some of your music. I am impressed......you are very good, Bobby.....an amazing talent! At first, you reminded me of Jim Croce, but with your own particular style. I am now subscribed to your channel. :D

-----odie-----

Us Harley riders are a breed apart from the rest of the pack......and, sometimes it takes one to appreciate the kind of free thinking mentality many of us harbor within our souls!
HARLEY 5.JPG
 
Last edited:
Joined
Oct 23, 2018
Messages
242
Likes
125
Location
Midland, TX
@Bobby Smith......I just played some of your music. I am impressed......you are very good, Bobby.....an amazing talent! At first, you reminded me of Jim Croce, but with your own particular style. I am now subscribed to your channel. :D

-----odie-----

Us Harley riders are a breed apart from the rest of the pack......and, sometimes it takes one to appreciate the kind of free thinking mentality many of us harbor within our souls!
View attachment 28667
Thanks Odie for listening! Glad you enjoyed it my friend.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
As with many of us turners, my tool rack(s) are a W.I.P. (work in progress).....:D

IMG_4774 (2).JPG IMG_4775 (2).JPG IMG_4776 (2).JPG IMG_4777 (2).JPG
IMG_4778 (2).JPG IMG_4779 (2).JPG

1. Main tool rack
2. On board tool caddy
3. Tool rests
4. Delta slow grinder, and accessories
5. Secondary tool rack
6. Bowls currently in progress
L to R:
Red box elder
English Walnut
Fiddleback Maple
Maple Burl
Australian White Tob Burl
East India Rosewood

-----odie-----
 
Joined
Feb 26, 2019
Messages
789
Likes
487
Location
Lebanon, Missouri
All of my cutting tools are mounted under the lathe and some on the end, sliding into pvc pipes sharp end 1st All tool handle butt end are labeled as well as like tools co-located. Tool rests and chucks have an anchored spot on a shelf under the angled tools. Drawers underneath all that hold extra jaws and various other tool. The pics are a bit dark but all I have at the moment.4118BF0F-3B4D-443F-BBD5-95CF5F0B18E0.jpeg EE376117-6394-469B-B005-12ABB9458110.jpeg
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
What's that carpet and jig for on your secondary tool cart?

Sorry Russell.......I hadn't realized you had asked me a question, until just now. The little schematic you see drawn on the rug is part of my method of raising burs on scrapers. This is a more recent addition, but I've been manually raising burs for quite a long time. What you are seeing are the last two steps of a 4-step method of doing this. Raising burs is not very common for woodturners anymore......usually you see mostly woodcarvers doing this now, but it was something that woodturners did use more commonly long ago. This is along the same lines as my insistence on using a traditional grind gouge, while most turners use, or have moved on to the more modern swept back grinds. :)

-----odie-----
IMG_4778 (2).JPG
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2018
Messages
1,013
Likes
974
Location
Ponsford, MN
Sorry Russell.......I hadn't realized you had asked me a question, until just now. The little schematic you see drawn on the rug is part of my method of raising burs on scrapers. This is a more recent addition, but I've been manually raising burs for quite a long time. What you are seeing are the last two steps of a 4-step method of doing this. Raising burs is not very common for woodturners anymore......usually you see mostly woodcarvers doing this now, but it was something that woodturners did use more commonly long ago. This is along the same lines as my insistence on using a traditional grind gouge, while most turners use, or have moved on to the more modern swept back grinds. :)

-----odie-----
View attachment 29018
That is an interesting point you have about raising burrs, maybe a new thread should be started to discuss the various uses and methods. The first might be to explain the diagram on the carpet.
 
Joined
Dec 22, 2006
Messages
5,852
Likes
3,090
Location
Panning for Montana gold, with Betsy, the mule!
That is an interesting point you have about raising burrs, maybe a new thread should be started to discuss the various uses and methods. The first might be to explain the diagram on the carpet.
Yes Odie an explanation of your burr turning method would be interesting

Many woodworkers raise burs by hand holding the scraper, and rubbing the steel (or carbide) by hand on the edge. Some use a Veritas jig permanently mounted by screws. I use the Veritas jig, but it's solidly held between the jaws of a drill press vise, while I raise a bur. I find this to be a much more positive method of uniformly raising a bur. A "ground" bur also works, but the ground burs have a more jagged edge. The diagram is something I came up with so that it doesn't waste my table space when I'm not using it. I used to have a special jig that fit between the ways of the lathe, but that was inconvenient, and got in the way of other things going on with the lathe.

I use the raised bur scrapers in much the same way that others use a ground bur scraper. No difference in how it's used, but with practice, the raised bur is a bit more versatile.

The four steps I use to raise a bur are:
1. grind scraper forward edge on grinder (just like making a "ground bur")
2. Polish the bottom corners of the scraper. (This makes the scraper slide on the tool rest easier while canted for shear scraping)
3. remove ground bur. The veritas jig is removed from the drill press vise, and the scraper is held firmly between the vise jaws. (I'm using a flat diamond hone for this)
4. Raise the bur on the Veritas jig. (held solidly in the vise jaws, and using my hips to apply force)

-----odie-----

The veritas is now mounted on a drill press vise, and the outlines you see on the previous photo represent the positioning of the vise while I perform the last two steps of raising the bur:
IMG_4776 (2).JPG
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1713.JPG
    IMG_1713.JPG
    512.6 KB · Views: 49
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
2,138
Likes
1,000
Location
Brandon, MS
lathe.

I use the raised bur scrapers in much the same way that others use a ground bur scraper. No difference in how it's used, but with practice, the raised bur is a bit more versatile.

The four steps I use to raise a bur are:
1. grind scraper forward edge on grinder (just like making a "ground bur")
2. Polish the bottom corners of the scraper. (This makes the scraper slide on the tool rest easier while canted for shear scraping)
3. remove ground bur. The veritas jig is removed from the drill press vise, and the scraper is held firmly between the vise jaws. (I'm using a flat diamond hone for this)
4. Raise the bur on the Veritas jig. (held solidly in the vise jaws, and using my hips to apply force)

-----odie-----

The veritas is now mounted on a drill press vise, and the outlines you see on the previous photo represent the positioning of the vise while I perform the last two steps of raising the bur:
View attachment 29020


To add to Odies post on scrapers this link will give you a better and more comprehensive look at sharpening cabinet scrapers. Also using a stone to flatten the scraper will give a smoother edge.
http://www.timberframe-tools.com/tools/sharpening-card-scraper/

in addition there are many posts on this subject but the difference these methods are just getting more refined.
 
Top